Game Reviews: Carnival Island & Medieval Moves

"Carnival Island"

For: Playstation 3 (Playstation Move required)

From: Magic Pixel Games/Sony

ESRB Rating: Everyone (comic mischief)

Price: $40

"Medieval Moves: Deadmund's Quest"

For: Playstation 3 (Playstation Move required)

From: Zindagi Games/Sony

ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+ (fantasy violence)

Price: $40

Every motion control system needs its own collection of carnival-themed mini-games, and "Carnival Island" would appear to be the Playstation 3's me-too equivalent. But the hand-drawn animation that opens the game's story mode suggests there's more to this collection than simple imitation, and while that isn't all the way true, it bears out to an encouraging degree.

"Island" features seven carnival standbys - frog bog, skeeball, hoops, coin/ring/baseball toss and shooting gallery - in its base offerings, and because the Move controller is just plain more precise than the Wii remote or Kinect, the games work exactly as you'd expect and respond to your motions precisely as they should.

The responsive controls are, naturally, "Island's" most important virtue. But the game's best asset lies in the way it breaks from convention in designing 28 additional games simply by rearranging those seven base games.

While some of these variants are simple tweaks to the rules or the way the playing field is arranged, others - replacing the baseball with a swingable wrecking ball, turning the skeeball lane into a slot machine, providing frogs you can steer in the air after launching them with the frog bog - are considerably more clever. Many of them exercise enough creativity to feel like different games entirely instead of mere offshoots.

"Island's" four-player multiplayer (offline only, sadly) very obviously positions it as a party game, but it bears repeating that the story campaign - about a dormant carnival you gradually return to life - is legitimately charming as a solo endeavor. If you like a challenge, all 35 games include a checklist of bonus objectives to complete, and many of them are certifiably tough. Naturally, because this is a carnival, you'll win tickets from games that let you collect prizes for your character and unlock a few exhibits (a magic mirror, for instance) that are just for fun.

At first blush, "Medieval Moves: Deadmund's Quest" appears to have nothing in common with "Island" past its controller. But like "Island," its best asset is the way it adopts a genre (light gun shooter) that's part and parcel with motion controls and takes it down a novel new road.

In "Quest," Deadmund (a friendly skeleton fighting unfriendly skeletons, and the story explains all) handles the walking while you handle the rest - swordplay, arrows, throwing stars, dynamite, a grappling hook and a periodic jump, duck or gear turn. You can choose which path Deadmund should take when he reaches a fork in the road, but otherwise, he moves forward automatically.

The resemblance there to light gun shooters is unmistakable, as are "Quest's" enemy formations and the way it scatters bonus items you can pick up if you're quick enough to do so before Deadmund runs past them.

But Deadmund's arsenal makes "Quest" a much more versatile and lively experience than your typical shooter, particularly because you can mix attacks as freely as you like. Swordplay is ideal for close-quarters combat, and how you wield the Move controller is how Deadmund will wield his sword and shield. Imitating a quill-pulling motion allows Deadmund to shoot arrows at faraway enemies, while a quick sideways fling of the controller lets him throw stars at advancing enemies.

"Quest" intuitively maps all these tasks to one controller, but if you have two, it's best enjoyed that way. The sword and shield are assigned to separate wands, alleviating the need to hold a button to use the shield, and shooting arrows is more fun when you imitate the bow motion with two controllers instead of point the one at the screen like a gun.

Either way, though, "Quest" is terrific fun - more an arcade game than what typically constitutes a quest in video game terms, but a fast, active adventure that is too nimble and seamless to feel gimmicky.

"Quest's" storyline is a solo endeavor, but a separate Battle mode - designed primarily around surviving formations of enemies in an arena you can zip through using the grappling hook - offers competitive and cooperative play for one or two players (online or splitscreen). It's simple, but it's fun for the same reasons the story is fun, and a persistent leveling system gives it legs by letting you upgrade weapons and unlock new characters as you accrue experience.

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