Top Signs Your Military Kid Has Gone Too Hooah

A child performs push-ups with a Marine during Operation Kids Investigating Deployment Services at Camp Sentinel on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force/Randall Moose)
A child performs push-ups with a Marine during Operation Kids Investigating Deployment Services at Camp Sentinel on Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force/Randall Moose)

Military kids are experts at embracing the military lifestyle. After all, for many, military life is all they've ever known.

But sometimes -- OK, a lot of the time -- it's a bit much. Military kids, it turns out, are highly susceptible to going too hooah.

It's not just that they're all in for military life. They've taken it to the next level.

So how do you know if your military kid has gone too hooah? We asked some of our favorite military parents. Here are their top real-life signs.

Your military kid may have gone too hooah if ...

He tells his brother to "go pound sand."

She has her own woobie.

He wears a PT belt on the playground.

She expertly uses the knife hand while making a point.

He uses phrases like "tracking," "roger" and "wilco" in everyday conversation.

She sings her favorite military service song while playing or dancing.

He salutes instead of saying "yes."

She yells "air assault" while jumping off something.

He can properly clear a room by age 10.

She responds to "move out" but not to "let's go," or any other variation.

He knows every type of tank and helicopter ever in service, but doesn't know his address.

She understands the instruction to "get your head out of your fourth point of contact."

He insists on rocking the high and tight.

She addresses everyone by only their last names.

He identifies anyone in uniform as "Daddy" (or "Mommy").

She calls all grocery stores "the commissary."

He asks why the National Anthem didn't play before the movie.

She refers to the final week of school as having "four days and a wake up."

He shames his sibling for taking a "Hollywood shower."

She can expertly insult other service branches and any graduate of a service academy.

He is wowed when he meets a child who has lived in a single location his whole life.

She understands the hand signals for "stop," "look," "direction" and "move out."

He asks to hear the service song instead of a lullaby.

She requests a visit to the DFAC for her birthday dinner.

 

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