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Six Common Credit Score Misconceptions

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\Content provided courtesy of USAA.

Myths abound: An apple a day probably won't keep the doctor away. And yes, you're probably using more than 10% of your brain while reading this.

The world of credit and credit scoring is not without its own set of myths.

Here, I'll highlight a few I run into on a regular basis.

  • You must carry a balance to get the best credit score. To have a good score, you must responsibly use credit, but that doesn't mean you need to carry a balance. In fact, part of your score is based on the amount of credit you have available but aren't using, so try to keep your credit card balances low. Zero is best, but aim for less than 20% of your total available credit limit.  
  • Closing old accounts will sink your score. But not for the reason you might think. A long credit history is important, but a closed account won't just disappear from your record. It will reflect on your score for years to come. On the other hand, closing an account, old or new, could immediately hurt your all-important utilization ratio (total debt divided by total available credit). 
  • Checking your credit report is a downer. Actually, it's a good thing. Get in the habit of keeping an eye on your credit report and score. Look for fraudulent activity and dispute errors. When you check your score, it's considered a soft inquiry, similar to a background check. It won't ding your score like applying for a loan or credit card will.
  • More accounts mean a lower score. Not exactly. Applying for several lines of credit and loans within a short period can hurt your score, but using a mix of different types of loans (installment, revolving and mortgage) is actually good for your rating.
  • More income means more score. What you earn is not even part of the formula for determining a credit score. I'm not saying a bigger paycheck isn't great, but it's not necessarily a reflection of how you handle credit. I've worked with plenty of people with lots of income and a poor grip on their debt. So, while a better debt-to-income ratio may improve the chance you'll get a loan, it's not reflected in your credit score.

By dispelling these credit myths, you can make an improved credit score a reality.

Related Topics

Personal Finances Credit Card Debt

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USAA, a diversified financial services organization, is the leading provider of competitively priced financial planning, insurance, investments, and banking products to members of the U.S. military and their eligible families. Rated among the highest among financial services companies for customer advocacy in a Forrester Research survey, USAA provides convenient and accessible financial products to its more than 9 million members. For more information about USAA, or to learn more about membership, visit usaa.com

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