Most Popular Military News

Contributor

This article is provided courtesy of Stars and Stripes, which got its start as a newspaper for Union troops during the Civil War, and has been published continuously since 1942 in Europe and 1945 in the Pacific. Stripes reporters have been in the field with American soldiers, sailors and airmen in World War II, Korea, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Bosnia and Kosovo, and are now on assignment in the Middle East.

Stars and Stripes has one of the widest distribution ranges of any newspaper in the world. Between the Pacific and European editions, Stars and Stripes services over 50 countries where there are bases, posts, service members, ships, or embassies.

Stars and Stripes Website

More Military Headlines

Marines Clarify Only Trace DNA Found at Helo Crash Site in Hawaii

Staff Sgt. Oscar Espinoza, a maintenance control Marine with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463, honors one of the fallen Marines at the memorial service Jan. 22, 2016, at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Lance Cpl. Harley Thomas/Marine Corps
Staff Sgt. Oscar Espinoza, a maintenance control Marine with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 463, honors one of the fallen Marines at the memorial service Jan. 22, 2016, at Marine Corps Base Hawaii. Lance Cpl. Harley Thomas/Marine Corps

FORT SHAFTER, Hawaii -- Only trace DNA elements belonging to Marines have been recovered since two helicopters crashed last month in Hawaii, the Marine Corps clarified Tuesday.

None of the 12 Marines who died in the Jan. 14 crash have been recovered, Marine Corps spokesperson Capt. Cassandra Gesecki said in a written statement.

The Star-Advertiser in Honolulu reported Monday that "some remains" had been retrieved, attributing the information to Timothy Irish, the Marine Corps captain who served as the primary Marine media contact during the five-day search for the missing Marines.

In Gesecki's clarification, she wrote that "trace elements of remains" in the form of DNA were recovered during the search-and-rescue phase that ended on Jan. 19.

"Nothing in addition to the trace elements of DNA have been found since then," she said.

Families of the Marines who had been identified through DNA have been informed, Gasecki said.

"In order to respect the families while the recovery effort continues, we will not go into further details about what was found at this time," she said.

The USNS Salvor and Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit One are using remotely operated underwater vehicles to "search, assess and survey" the crash site to further identify and map the debris field as sea conditions permit, Gesecki said.

"Recovery and salvage operations can take several months to complete, but can be extended based on several factors, including the size of the debris field and other environmental factors," she said.

The debris field from the two CH-53E helicopters is about two miles offshore from Waimea Bay, strewn in an area roughly 300 feet beneath the surface. High winds and waves are common in the North Shore during the winter months.

The crash investigation is being led by the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing.

Related Topics

Marine Corps Headlines

Military News App by Military.com

Download the new Military.com News App for Android on Google Play or for Apple devices on iTunes!

You May Also Like

© 2016 Military Advantage