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Army ROTC Career Paths

Army ROTC prepares college students to succeed in any competitive environment. The leadership training and experiences that students have in the Army ROTC will provide them with a foundation to become commissioned Army Officers upon graduation.

Upon completion of the Army ROTC program, graduates will be commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Army and will embark on specialized training in their first Army branch.

Army ROTC also provides a gateway to nursing students to pursue a career in the Army Nurse Corps.

Upon completion of Officer branch training and a first assignment, Army Officers may pursue additional specialized training and post-graduate education opportunities. They will be assigned to advanced leadership positions and to staff positions in upper management. Also, they may develop doctrine, teach military tactics or serve as advisors.

When you graduate from college as an Army ROTC Cadet, you will earn the rank of Second Lieutenant. Your career as an Officer will be just beginning, and you'll find a variety of interesting Officer career fields in the Army.

Air Defense Artillery Officer

The Army's Air Defense Artillery Branch has had to evolve to manage the diverse air and missile threat seen in the early part of the 21st century. It is one of the most high-tech and modern forces within the Army and the Officers who lead it must sharpen their skills constantly as this technology evolves.

The role of an Air Defense Artillery Officer is to be a leader in operations specific to the Air Defense Artillery Branch and to be an expert in the tactics, techniques and procedures for the employment of air defense systems. You will lead teams in protecting U.S. forces from aerial attack, missile attack and enemy surveillance.

You will also become an expert in one or more of the following systems; PATRIOT Missile System, Bradley Linebacker System, Man Portable Air Defense System, and AVENGER System.

The responsibilities of an Air Defense Artillery Lieutenant may include

  • Coordinating the Air Defense target engagement process in joint and multi-national operations.
  • Coordinating employment of Air Defense Artillery Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

Armor Officer

The Army's Armor Branch is responsible for all the tank and cavalry/forward reconnaissance operations on the battlefield. The role of an Armor Officer is to be a leader in operations specific to the Armor Branch and to lead others in many areas of combat operations.

As an Armor Officer, you may either work with tank units that utilize the M1A1 and M1A2 Abrams Tanks, or cavalry units responsible for forward reconnaissance operations.

The responsibilities of an Armor Lieutenant may include:

  • Leading and controlling the Armor and combined armed forces during land combat.
  • Coordinating employment of Armor Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

Aviation Officer

The Army's Aviation Branch is critical in so many of the Army's operations. From providing quick-strike and long-range target engagement during combat operations to hauling troops and supplies, Army helicopter units are key in getting the job done in many situations.

An Officer within the Aviation Branch is first an expert aviator, but is also responsible for the coordination of Aviation operations from maintenance to control tower operations to tactical field missions.

All Aviation Officers lead Soldiers and Aviation units and work with the following Army helicopters; OH-58 Kiowa, UH-60 Black Hawk, CH-47 Chinook, and AH-64 Apache.

The responsibilities of an Aviation Lieutenant may include:

  • Coordinating employment of Aviation Soldiers and aircraft at all levels, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.
  • Provide Aviation coordination
  • Instruct Aviation skills at service schools and combat training centers

Engineer Officer

An Officer in the Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for providing support in a full spectrum of engineering duties. Engineer Officers help the Army and the Nation in building structures, developing civil works programs, working with natural resources as well as providing combat support on the battlefield.

Combat Engineer Officer

Combat Engineer Officers have the engineering skills to support combat missions which can include: bridge building and destruction; minefield emplacement and reduction; and other tasks requiring specialized engineering skills and equipment.

Construction Engineer Officer
Construction Engineer Officers build and maintain roads, airfields and other facilities that support combat operations. During peacetime these Officers help in building schools and other structures.

Topographic Engineer Officer
Topographic Engineer Officers know how to operate terrain depiction equipment and give analyses that give Maneuver Commanders an edge in battle.

The responsibilities of an Engineer Lieutenant may include:

  • Planning and executing engineering missions, both combat and construction
  • Understanding tactical decision making and the Engineer's role as a leader in a combined arms or joint-force environment
  • Coordinating employment of Engineer Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Field Artillery Officer


The Army's Field Artillery Branch is responsible for neutralizing or suppressing the enemy by cannon, rocket and missile fire and to help integrate all fire support assets into combined arms operations. The role of a Field Artillery Officer is to be a leader in operations specific to the Field Artillery Branch and to be an expert in the tactics, techniques and procedures for the employment of fire support systems.

The responsibilities of a Field Artillery Lieutenant may include:

  • Leading and controlling Field Artillery troops and combined armed forces during land combat.
  • Coordinating employment of Field Artillery Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.



Infantry Officer


The Infantry is the main land combat force and core fighting strength of the Army. It's equally important during peacetime and in combat. The role of an Infantry Officer is to be a leader in operations specific to the Infantry and to lead others in all areas of land combat.

The responsibilities of an Infantry Lieutenant may include:

  • Leading and controlling the Infantry and combined armed forces during land combat.
  • Coordinating employment of Infantry Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

Chemical Officer

A new frontier of defense for our country is the threat of Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) weapons and Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). The Chemical Officer advises the commander on issues regarding nuclear, biological and radiological warfare, defense and homeland protection. Chemical Officers also employ Chemical units in combat support with chemical, smoke and flame weapons, technology and management.

The responsibilities of a Chemical Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling Chemical operations and combined armed forces during combat and peacetime.
  • Coordinating employment of Chemical Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Military Intelligence Officer

The Army's Military Intelligence (MI) is responsible for all intelligence gathered or learned during Army missions. MI Officers are always out front, providing essential intelligence and in many cases saving Soldiers who are fighting on the front lines.

Military Intelligence Officers also assess risks associated with friendly and enemy courses of action and act to counter or neutralize identified intelligence threats. The MI Officer also uses intelligence systems and data to reduce uncertainty of enemy, terrain and weather conditions for a commander.

A Military Intelligence Officer and specialize in these specific areas:

Imagery Intelligence Officer: Supervises the collection and analysis of optical, infrared and RADAR imagery using photogrammetry and terrain analysis.

All-Source Intelligence Officer: Performs collection management, surveillance and reconnaissance activities and provides advice on the use of resources on all levels.

Counterintelligence Officer: Provides coordination and participation in counterintelligence investigations, operations and production.

Human Intelligence (HUMINT) Officer: Coordinates and participates in controlled collection operations and interviews.

Signals Intelligence/Electronic Warfare Officer: Coordinates and participates in the collection of signals intelligence (SIGINT) and conducts electronic warfare.

All-Source Intelligence Aviator: Performs duties as Aviator and MI Officer. Coordinates and participates in Special Electronic Mission Aircraft (SEMA) missions.

The responsibilities of a Military Intelligence Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling the Military Intelligence Soldiers and combined armed forces during combat and intelligence gathering operations.
  • Coordinating employment of Military Intelligence Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Military Police Officer

The Army's Military Police provide an important function in the full spectrum of Army operations. The Army's Military Police can be utilized in direct combat and during peacetime. As a Military Police Officer there are five main functions you will be responsible for within this branch:
1. Maneuver and mobility support operations
2. Area security operations
3. Law and order operations
4. Internment and resettlement operations
5. Police intelligence operations

These five functions of the Army's Military Police all provide a commander with the necessary information and support for the successful completion of many Army missions.

The responsibilities of a Military Police Lieutenant may include:

  • Command and direct Military Police units and organizations.
  • Provide Military Police coordination at all levels.
  • Develop doctrine, organizations and equipment for future military police missions.
  • Serve as Military Police advisor to Army Reserve and Army National Guard organizations.


Signal Officer

The Army's Signal Corps is responsible for all systems of communication for the entire Army. The Signal Corps strives to always provide seamless, secure, consistent and dynamic information systems at all levels of command and for any situation. On every mission, communications and data management (handled by the Signal Corps) have become increasingly critical for the Army and its continued success.

A Signal Corps Officer, then, must be an expert in planning, installing, integrating, operating and maintaining the Army's voice, data and information systems, services and resources. Signal Officers must be highly intelligent, forward-thinking and have a complete knowledge of these various technologies.

The responsibilities of a Signal Lieutenant may include:

  • Planning and executing all aspects of communication on missions, both during combat and peacetime
  • Understanding tactical decision making and the Signal Officer's role as a leader in a combined arms or joint-force environment
  • Coordinating employment of Signal Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Adjutant General Officer

An Adjutant General Officer is responsible for helping Soldiers with the tasks that affect their overall welfare and well being, while assisting commanders by keeping Soldiers combat-ready. In many cases, the duties of an Adjutant General Officer are very similar to the function of a high-level human resources executive in the civilian world.

The responsibilities of an Adjutant General Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling personnel and administrative operations and combined armed forces during combat and peacetime.
  • Coordinating employment of Adjutant General Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Finance Officer

The Army's Finance Corps is responsible for sustaining operations through purchasing and acquiring supplies and services. Officers in the Finance Corps make sure commercial vendors are paid, contractual payments are met, balancing and projecting budgets, paying Soldiers for their service and other financial matters of keeping the Army running.

Some specific financial management areas for a Finance Officer include; Army pay, Commercial vendor support, Disbursement of public funds, Auditing, Travel and transportation allowances, Accounting, Financial management information systems, and Banking.

The responsibilities of a Finance Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling Financial operations and combined armed forces during combat and peacetime.
  • Coordinating employment of Finance Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Medical Corps Officer

An Army Medical Corps Officer is responsible for the overall health of Soldiers and their families. They are also responsible for providing health care to Soldiers' families and others eligible to receive this care in the military community. During combat, the Medical Corps Officer oversees the emergency medical management of casualties and makes sure Soldiers are combat ready when it comes to their overall health.

A Medical Corps Officer can specialize in the following areas; Allergist, Anesthesiologist, Cardiologist, Child Neurologist, Child Psychiatrist, Clinical Immunologist, Clinical Pharmacologist, Dermatologist, Diagnostic Radiologist, Emergency Medicine Physician, Endocrinologist, Family Practice Physician, Flight Surgeon, Gastroenterologist, General Surgeon, Hematologist, Immunologist, Infectious Disease Physician, Internal Medicine Physician, Medical Oncologist, Nephrologist, Neurologist, Neurosurgeon, Nuclear Medicine Physician, OB/GYN, Occupational Medicine Physician, Oncologist, Ophthalmologist, Orthopedic Surgeon, Otolaryngologist, Pathologist, Pediatric Cardiologist, Pediatrician, Pediatric Medicine Physician, Peripheral Vascular Surgeon, Physiatrist, Plastic Surgeon, Preventive Medicine Physician, Specialties, Psychiatrist, Pulmonary Disease Physician, Radiologist, Rheumatologist, Therapeutic Radiologist, Thoracic Surgeon, Urologist, Vascular Surgeon.

The responsibilities of an Medical Corps Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling the Medical Corps units during emergency and non-emergency medical situations.
  • Coordinating employment of Medical Corps Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.


Nurse Corps Officer

As an Officer in the Army Nurse Corps, you will lead a nursing team in caring for Soldiers and their families. You will be responsible for all aspects of a patient's care and see that they are addressed, and initiate the coordination of a patient's multidisciplinary care.

As a Nurse Corps Officer you will practice in a network that believes in a holistic nursing philosophy. You'll identify and organize resources for patients and their families to help them with inpatient, outpatient and home care. Because you're also a professional in the Army, you'll be able to understand the special concerns and needs of Soldiers, allowing you to better serve them.

As an Army Nurse Corps Officer, you can specialize in one of the following areas; Advanced Practice Nurse, Community Health Nurse, Critical Care Nurse, CRNA, Emergency Room Nurse, Family Nurse Practitioner, Medical-Surgical Nurse, Nurse Anesthetist, Nurse Midwife, OB/GYN Nurse, Operating Room Nurse, Perioperative Nurse, and Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse.

The responsibilities of a Nurse Corps Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling Nurse Corps units during emergency and non-emergency medical situations
  • Coordinating employment of Nurse Corps Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

If you're considering an undergraduate Nursing degree, joining Army ROTC can enhance your leadership skills and critical-thinking abilities while providing financial support to help make your professional goals a reality. Learn more about the Army Nursing Program.

Ordnance Officer

A key component to the Army's success is the maintenance of a wide range of weapons systems, commonly called "ordnance." Ordnance Officers are responsible for ensuring that these weapons systems, vehicles, and equipment are ready and available--and in perfect working order--at all times.

An Ordnance Officer will also manage the developing, testing, fielding, handling, storage and disposal of munitions.

The responsibilities of an Ordnance Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling Ordnance operations and combined armed forces during land combat.
  • Coordinating employment of Ordnance Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

Quartermaster Officer

The Quartermaster Corps is the logistical center point for all Army operations. Quartermaster Officers are responsible for making sure equipment, materials and systems are available and functioning for missions. More specifically, the Quartermaster Officer provides supply support for Soldiers and units in field services, aerial delivery and material and distribution management.

The responsibilities of a Quartermaster Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling Quartermaster operations and combined armed forces during land combat.
  • Coordinating employment of Quartermaster Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

Transportation Officer

The Transportation Corps is responsible for moving supplies, troops and equipment anywhere on the globe. During war, the Transportation Corps utilizes trucks, boats and airplanes to provide extremely fast support to the combat teams on the frontlines. Transportation Officers are experts in the systems, vehicles and procedures in moving troops and supplies in the Army.

The responsibilities of a Transportation Lieutenant may include:

  • Commanding and controlling Transportation operations and combined armed forces during land combat.
Coordinating employment of Transportation Soldiers at all levels of command, from platoon to battalion and higher, in U.S. and multi-national operations.

Army ROTC Related Topics

 


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