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Tactical Fitness: ROTC Options out of High School

Tactical Fitness: ROTC cadets

There are many options available to future military members who are motivated out of high school to serve.  Here is an email from a thoughtful young man seeking advice on how to choose a branch of the military to serve.

Dear Stew,

I am 17 years old and going into my senior year of high school. I have always wanted to join the military and would like to go through ROTC/NROTC in college to help me get there. I must admit, I need some guidance however. First, I have yet to decide which branch I'd like to join between the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Each have different jobs as an officer that interest me, and as I approach the time to decide, it becomes harder to know where I belong. How do you know what your calling is in the military? My second question has to do with fitness. I am very motivated to work out on my own. I have never had a mentor and my friends aren't interested in the military. I work out and run, but I am not sure if I am making any progress. What should I be doing to get prepared on a weekly basis?

Thank you very much for taking the time to read this.

As far as fitness for you and your goals: First you have to focus on getting to the training and an ROTC scholarship, and that requires acing the fitness tests:

  • Army 2 min pushups, 2 min situps, 2 mile run
  • AF/ Navy 2 min pushups, 2 min situps 1.5 mile run
  • USMC - max pullups, 2 min situps, 3 mile run

Related articles for tips for training:

Once you are in college, you have plenty of time to prepare for what will help you make it to and through other military training programs from Pilot, SEAL, EOD, Infantry, and all others. The good thing about ROTC programs is that you get exposed to all your options.

Get good at all if you do not know your calling. I personally made my decision by looking at where I would be living depending on the branch I joined. Growing up in Florida, I enjoyed the beach and ocean, so I liked the fact that nearly all Navy bases were on the water or near a beach town.

You are right. The military is a calling.  It's a profession, not just a job to snap up if you cannot think of what you want to do in the civilian world.  You have the right approach to your future. Take some time to think about what you like to do. What motivates you the most?

Good luck and thanks for considering military service to our country.

Stew Smith 

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Tactical Fitness Stew Smith

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Contributor

Stew Smith works as a presenter and editorial board member with the Tactical Strength and Conditioning program of the National Strength and Conditioning Association and is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). He has also written hundreds of articles on Military.com's Fitness Center that focus on a variety of fitness, nutritional, and tactical issues military members face throughout their career.

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