The Quasi-War With France & The Barbary Wars

The 103d Infantry arrived in France with the 26th Division in October 1917 and began training under French instructors near the town of Neufchateau, where the New England doughboys endured a harsh winter. (Photo: Maine National Guard Archives)
The 103d Infantry arrived in France with the 26th Division in October 1917 and began training under French instructors near the town of Neufchateau, where the New England doughboys endured a harsh winter. (Photo: Maine National Guard Archives)

American and French ships battled in the West Indies even though there was no formal declaration of war. The Pasha of Tripoli declared war on the United States in 1801, and in 1815 President James Madison asked Congress to declare war on Algeria. American merchant ships were in great danger at this time because there was no national navy to protect them abroad.

While typically thought of as a rebuilding time in United States history, it was a busy and tough time for American seamen.

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19th Century Conflicts