Fort Hood Top Enlisted Leader Reinstated after Probe Finds No Proof of Unprofessional Language

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Command Sgt. Maj. Cliff Burgoyne, then 82nd Airborne Division command sergeant major, gives remarks during the 82nd Abn. Div. Change of Command and Change of Responsibility Ceremony on Fort Bragg, N.C., July 10, 2020. Burgoyne, now Fort Hood's top enlisted soldier, was suspended in December pending an investigation. (Alexander Burnett/Army)
Command Sgt. Maj. Cliff Burgoyne, then 82nd Airborne Division command sergeant major, gives remarks during the 82nd Abn. Div. Change of Command and Change of Responsibility Ceremony on Fort Bragg, N.C., July 10, 2020. Burgoyne, now Fort Hood's top enlisted soldier, was suspended in December pending an investigation. (Alexander Burnett/Army)

U.S. Army Forces Command has reinstated the top enlisted leader at Fort Hood, Texas after an investigation cleared him of allegations that he used unprofessional language with subordinates last year.

Lt. Gen. Pat White, commanding general of III Corps, suspended Command Sgt. Maj. Arthur "Cliff" Burgoyne III in December after allegations involving a specific incident and the language Burgoyne used to address subordinates.

Forces Command (FORSCOM) concluded its investigation Friday, ruling Burgoyne's language was "not unprofessional and he did not exhibit counterproductive leadership," according to a FORSCOM news release issued Friday evening.

"Putting People first includes holding our leaders to a high standard," FORSCOM Commander Gen. Michael Garrett said in the release. "Command Sgt. Maj. Burgoyne is a tough leader who cares about every soldier in his formation. I have faith in his leadership, and I know his soldiers are his top priority."

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The investigation came on the heels of an independent review of Fort Hood focused on the installation's command climate in light of the murder of Spc. Vanessa Guillen. The review found that the command allowed a culture of sexual assault and sexual harassment to exist unchecked at Hood. It resulted in the firing or suspension of 14 leaders at the post.

FORSCOM stressed that Burgoyne's investigation was unrelated to the other investigations occurring at Hood.

Ryan McCarthy, then secretary of the Army, ordered the suspension of 1st Cavalry Commander Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Broadwater and Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas C. Kenny, the 1st Cavalry's command sergeant major, pending the outcome of a fact-finding investigation into 1st Cavalry Division's command climate and the unit's Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention program, known as SHARP.

The Army also selected Gen. John Murray, commanding general of Army Futures Command and one of the Army's most senior commanders, to lead an in-depth investigation into the chain of command's actions related to Guillen.

-- Matthew Cox can be reached at matthew.cox@military.com.

Related: Fort Hood's Top Enlisted Soldier Suspended, Investigation Pending

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