Navy EOD Commander Sacked Over Loss of Confidence

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Cmdr. Sean Kido of the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet speaks to journalists at a 5th Fleet Base,  during a trip organized by the Navy for journalists, near Fujairah, United Arab Emirates, Wednesday, June 19, 2019 (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)
Cmdr. Sean Kido of the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet speaks to journalists at a 5th Fleet Base, during a trip organized by the Navy for journalists, near Fujairah, United Arab Emirates, Wednesday, June 19, 2019 (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

A Navy explosive ordnance expert who earlier this year was put forward to discuss the type of mine that tore through a Japanese oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz has been relieved of command.

Cmdr. Sean Kido was removed from his job as commanding officer of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eleven on Thursday. Capt. Oscar Rojas, commander of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group One, carried out the relief after losing confidence in Kido's ability to lead, Navy officials said Friday.

Kido's relief was not the result of any personal misconduct, Lt. Kara Handley, an EOD Group One spokeswoman, said.

Related: Navy Expert: Tanker Attack Mine Resembles Iranian Mines

"It was just a loss of confidence over time," she said.

Cmdr. Evan Colbert, the former commanding officer of EOD Mobile Unit 6, has replaced Kido as the head of EOD Mobile Unit 11. Kido has temporarily been reassigned to EOD Group One until further detailing can be decided, Handley said.

Kido, who did not immediately respond to a request for comment, led the California-based mobile unit since June 2018. He previously served in Iraq, Bahrain, Hawaii and Japan.

His personal awards include a Bronze Star with combat "V" device, a Defense Meritorious Service Medal, a Joint Service Commendation Medal, five Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals and two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals.

In June, Kido addressed reporters after leading an EOD diving and salvage task group with Naval Forces Central Command following a pair of attacks on tankers in the Gulf of Oman. The damage, Kido said at the time, was consistent with that caused by a limpet mine and bore a striking resemblance to similar attacks carried out by Iran.

-- Gina Harkins can be reached at gina.harkins@military.com. Follow her on Twitter @ginaaharkins.

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