Bill Would Grant Enlisted MoH Recipients, POWs Same Arlington Honors as Officers

FILE -- The 3d US Infantry Regiment (Old Guard) Caisson Platoon participate in the full honors funeral of U.S. Marine Corps Col. Wesley Fox at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, April 17, 2018. (U.S. Army/Elizabeth Fraser)
FILE -- The 3d US Infantry Regiment (Old Guard) Caisson Platoon participate in the full honors funeral of U.S. Marine Corps Col. Wesley Fox at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, April 17, 2018. (U.S. Army/Elizabeth Fraser)

In his final year in Congress, 87-year-old Rep. Sam Johnson, R-Texas, a legendary Air Force fighter pilot in Korea and Vietnam and a former prisoner of war, is backing a bill to give enlisted Medal of Honor recipients and POWs the same honors as officers in burials at Arlington National Cemetery.

"My fellow POWs who served honorably demonstrated the utmost patriotism, but not all of them were eligible for full military honors at their burial, simply due to their rank. I believe this is wrong," Johnson said in a statement.

Current rules restrict full honors at in-ground burials at Arlington, including a military escort and a horse-drawn caisson, to officers, warrant officers, senior non-commissioned officers and service members killed in action.

Eligibility rules for in-ground burial at Arlington, which is running out of space, are the strictest of all the national cemeteries. They may in future be limited to those killed in action and recipients of the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Silver Star and the Purple Heart, according to a current proposal under consideration.

Prisoners of war who were discharged honorably and died after Nov. 30, 1993, are also eligible, according to the Code of Federal Regulations. There were no immediate figures available on how many enlisted MoH recipients or POWs may have been denied full honors at Arlington due to current rules.

Most honorably discharged veterans can request Arlington as their final resting place, but the eligibility rules are lengthy. (The list of rules can be found here.)

Rep. Mike Bishop, R-Michigan, is the main sponsor of the Full Military Honors Act, which was introduced in the House earlier this month. He said he came to the issue at the behest of the family of a deceased constituent, Army Pfc. Robert Fletcher, a Korean War POW who was buried without full honors at Arlington in June.

"America's POWs and Medal of Honor recipients have sacrificed immeasurably in service to the United States, regardless of their rank," Bishop said in a statement. "So I was shocked to find out that earlier this year a former POW from Michigan was denied a full honors burial at Arlington National Cemetery based solely on his enlisted rank. This has been an issue for too long, and my legislation will ensure those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty are provided the full military honors they have earned for their end-of-life ceremonies."

Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minnesota, the highest-ranking enlisted soldier ever to serve in Congress, co-sponsored the bill. "I'm proud to join in introducing the Full Military Honors Act," said Walz, who retired from the Army National Guard as a command sergeant major after 24 years. "To help ensure we honor the sacrifices these heroes and their families have made for our country, we must pass it without delay."

The bill has been endorsed by the American Legion, the Paralyzed Veterans of America, the Military Officers Association of America, the National League of POW/MIA Families, the Special Operations Association, the Special Forces Association and the American Fallen Warriors Memorial Foundation.

At a hearing of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Military Personnel in March, officials warned that space for in-ground burials at Arlington would eventually run out because surrounding communities restrict its expansion.

"We are filling up every single day" at the 154-year-old historic site across the Potomac from Washington, D.C., where an average of 150 burials take place each week, said Karen Durham-Aguilera, executive director of Army National Military Cemeteries.

Estimates on when Arlington will run out of space vary, but some put the date for closing the cemetery to new burials in the 2030s or 2040s.

As of August 2017, there were 5,071 living former POWs in the U.S., according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. There are currently 72 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, 45 of whom were in the enlisted ranks when they received the award, according to the Congressional Medal of Honor Society.

The full honors issue has resonated over the years with Johnson, a retired Air Force colonel and recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross, two Silver Stars and two Purple Hearts.

During the Korean War, he flew 62 combat missions in a F-86 Sabre and was credited with shooting down one MiG-15. In Vietnam, he flew the F-4 Phantom II. On his 25th combat mission in Vietnam on April 16, 1966, Johnson's aircraft was shot down over North Vietnam. He was a POW for nearly seven years, including 42 months in solitary confinement.

A battered tin cup he used to tap on the walls to communicate in code with other prisoners is now in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. In the prison camps, Johnson was part of a group dubbed the "Alcatraz 11" for their resistance to the guards.

"Any veteran who served honorably as a prisoner of war or whose actions earned them the Medal of Honor has already demonstrated extraordinary dedication to defending freedom," Johnson said in his statement. "In return, they deserve to have the country they fought for bestow full military honors if they are eligible to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery."

Since the death of Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, last month, Johnson is the only former POW serving in Congress. Earlier this year, he announced that he would retire at the end of the term after serving in the House since 1991.

In his statement upon McCain's death, Johnson, who was often at odds with the late senator on issues, paid tribute to the former Navy pilot who was with him in the prison camps.

"We have lost a genuine American hero today. John and I were fellow POWs at the 'Hanoi Hilton,' and I can testify to the fact that he did everything he could to defend freedom and honor our great nation -- not just in that hell on Earth, but beyond those bleak years," Johnson said. "John's strength of spirit, commitment to democracy, and love of God and country all shape the inspiring legacy of service he leaves behind. God bless you, partner, and I salute you."

-- Richard Sisk can be reached at Richard.Sisk@Military.com.

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