Nuclear Weapons

Nation's Bloated Nuclear Spending Comes Under Fire

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. -- At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a seven-year, $213 million upgrade to the security system that protects the lab's most sensitive nuclear bomb-making facilities doesn't work. Those same facilities, which sit atop a fault line, remain susceptible to collapse and dangerous radiation releases, despite millions more spent on im... more

Former Commander: Nukes on High Alert are Vulnerable to Error

minuteman 3 600x400

WASHINGTON — A former commander of U.S. nuclear forces is leading a call for taking U.S. and Russian nuclear missiles off high alert, arguing that keeping them less ready for prompt launch would reduce the risk of miscalculation in a crisis. It also could keep a possible cyberattack from starting a nuclear war, he said, although neither Washing... more

Marshall Islands Will Appeal in Nuclear Case Against US

In this June 2014 file photo, Capt. Robby Modad closes the gate at an ICBM launch control facility in the countryside outside Minot, N.D., on the Minot Air Force Base. Charlie Riedel/AP

UNITED NATIONS -- The tiny Pacific nation of the Marshall Islands is persisting with an unprecedented lawsuit demanding that the United States meet its obligations toward getting rid of its nuclear weapons. It filed notice Thursday that it will appeal a federal judge's decision to dismiss the case. The island group was the site of 67 nuclear te... more

New Nuclear Weapons Needed, Experts Say, Pointing to Aged Arsenal

Two maintainers work on a missile while it sits erect in its capsule. Malmstrom's first flight of Minute-man missiles went on alert Oct. 26, 1962. (U.S. Air Force/courtesy photo)

REPORTING FROM WASHINGTON -- Two decades after the U.S. began to scale back its nuclear forces in the aftermath of the Cold War, a number of military strategists, scientists and congressional leaders are calling for a new generation of hydrogen bombs. Warheads in the nation's stockpile are an average of 27 years old, which raises serious concer... more

US Nuke Arsenal Still Controlled by Floppy Disks

Two maintainers work on a missile while it sits erect in its capsule. Malmstrom's first flight of Minute-man missiles went on alert Oct. 26, 1962. (U.S. Air Force/courtesy photo)

A Minuteman-3 missile with the power to cause 20 times the damage as the bombs dropped on Hiroshima lies underground in Wyoming, a relic of the cold-war still very much capable of being fired, controlled by archaic equipment also left over from that era. In a special titled "Who's Minding the Nukes?" by Leslie Stahl on CBS' 60 Minutes, the U.S.... more

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