Nuclear Weapons

Nation's Bloated Nuclear Spending Comes Under Fire

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. -- At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a seven-year, $213 million upgrade to the security system that protects the lab's most sensitive nuclear bomb-making facilities doesn't work. Those same facilities, which sit atop a fault line, remain susceptible to collapse and dangerous radiation releases, despite millions more spent on im... more

New Nuclear Weapons Needed, Experts Say, Pointing to Aged Arsenal

Two maintainers work on a missile while it sits erect in its capsule. Malmstrom's first flight of Minute-man missiles went on alert Oct. 26, 1962. (U.S. Air Force/courtesy photo)

REPORTING FROM WASHINGTON -- Two decades after the U.S. began to scale back its nuclear forces in the aftermath of the Cold War, a number of military strategists, scientists and congressional leaders are calling for a new generation of hydrogen bombs. Warheads in the nation's stockpile are an average of 27 years old, which raises serious concer... more

US Nuke Arsenal Still Controlled by Floppy Disks

Two maintainers work on a missile while it sits erect in its capsule. Malmstrom's first flight of Minute-man missiles went on alert Oct. 26, 1962. (U.S. Air Force/courtesy photo)

A Minuteman-3 missile with the power to cause 20 times the damage as the bombs dropped on Hiroshima lies underground in Wyoming, a relic of the cold-war still very much capable of being fired, controlled by archaic equipment also left over from that era. In a special titled "Who's Minding the Nukes?" by Leslie Stahl on CBS' 60 Minutes, the U.S.... more

Army Investigates Radiation Exposure at Fort Bliss

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FORT BLISS, Texas - Army investigators have detected radiation at a former nuclear weapons bunker at Fort Bliss and they're determining whether people on the West Texas post have been exposed, officials said Tuesday. Post leaders said contaminated residue was buried in the 1950s and 1960s, when the base was operated by the Air Force. A man who ... more

STRATCOM: Future Nuke Reductions Must Be Bilateral

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Any U.S. moves to reduce the size of its nuclear arsenal from the current levels should be done bilaterally and in negotiations with Russia, the head of the U.S. Strategic Command told a congressional panel on Tuesday. "I think in the long run … if we're going to engage in another conversation about reductions below the New START [Strategic Arm... more

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