Libya

Militant Pleads Not Guilty in Benghazi Attacks

Ahmed Abu Khattala

WASHINGTON — A Libyan militant on Monday pleaded not guilty to charges arising from the 2012 Benghazi attacks that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens. Ahmed Abu Khattala, 43, entered the plea through his lawyer in a 15-minute court proceeding before a federal judge. An 18-count grand jury indictment handed up last w... more

Battle Erupts for Control of Benghazi, Libya

A fire truck drives towards smoke caused by an attack by Islamist militias during clashes with forces led by renegade Libyan Gen. Khalifa Hifter in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Mohammed el-Sheikhy)

Benghazi, Libya, saw gunfire and airstrikes in an attempt by forces loyal to former Gen. Khalifa Haftar to reclaim the city from Islamist militias. Witnesses Wednesday said Haftar's forces targeted one of the several armed groups roaming the city, the Feb. 17 Martyrs Brigade, which is aligned with Ansar al-Sharia, in turn aligned with al-Qaida.... more

6 Killed in Mystery Airstrikes in Libyan Capital

CAIRO — Airstrikes launched by an unknown party targeting Islamist-led militias in Libya's capital killed six people Monday, authorities said, as the interim government vowed to investigate the strikes amid raging street battles. The confusion over who launched the two fighter jets shows the chaos still engulfing Libya after the 2011 civil war ... more

Libya Islamic Militias Declare Control of Benghazi

BENGHAZI, Libya — Islamic hard-line militias claimed to have taken control of Libya's second largest city, Benghazi, after defeating army units, taking over military barracks and seizing tanks, rockets and hundreds of boxes of ammunition, as fighting in the capital prompted a wave of evacuations Thursday by foreign nationals, diplomats and Liby... more

Officers Say No 'Stand-Down Order' for Benghazi

This Sept. 13, 2012 file photo shows a Libyan man walking in the rubble of the damaged U.S. consulate, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens on, Sept. 11, 2012, in Benghazi, Libya. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)

WASHINGTON -- Military officers testified that there was no "stand-down order" that held back military assets that could have saved the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans killed at a diplomatic outpost and CIA annex in Benghazi, Libya. Their testimony undercut the contention of Republican lawmakers. The "stand-down" theory centers on a ... more

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