Famous Veterans

  • Arnold Palmer on golf course
    In Remembrance: 10 Famous Veterans Who Passed in 2016
    Military.com
    2016 saw the passing of many notable veterans. Here we celebrate a few of those who left us, and honor their achievements.
  • Bea Arthur
    Seven Famous Women Veterans
    Military.com
    From a computer genius to a popular sitcom star, talented women have made their mark in the U.S. military.
  • Morgan Freeman headshot.
    Famous Veteran: Morgan Freeman
    Military.com
    "I did three years, eight months, and ten days in all, but it took me a year and a half to get disabused of my romantic notions."
  • Chuck Norris
    Famous Veterans: Chuck Norris
    Military.com
    The martial arts superstar first started honing his skills while on duty in the Air Force during the Korean War.
  • Mr. T
    Famous Veterans: Mr. T
    Military.com
    Before he went on to fame as B.A. Baracus on "The A-Team," Mr. T was a member of the biggest team of them all -- the U.S. Army.
  • Bob Ross with a completed painting
    Famous Veteran: Bob Ross
    Military.com
    "I was the guy who makes you scrub the latrine, the guy who makes you make your bed, the guy who screams at you for being late ...
  • Clint Eastwood
    Famous Veterans: Clint Eastwood
    Military.com
    The famous actor and director got an early start on developing his tough-guy persona when he worked as a bouncer at the NCO clu...
  • Gene Hackman in the "French Connection."
    Famous Veteran: Gene Hackman
    Military.com
    "I have trouble with direction, because I have trouble with authority. I was not a good Marine."

Lloyd Staley: Veteran's Story

James Clark Hughes
Capt. James Clark Hughes and members of Kansas National Guard in Europe during WWI.

Lloyd Staley Bio:

Born: September 16, 1895
Died: December 16, 1983

Lloyd Staley's army career began August 5, 1917, at Garnett, Kansas, which was the headquarters for Company K, Kansas National Guard. The raw recruits of K Company stayed at Garnett all of August and most of September, until moving to advanced training camp at Lawton, Oklahoma. The company then became part of the 35th Division, U.S. Army -- and Company K became Company K 137th U.S. Infantry.

The 35th Division entrained for Camp Mills, Mineola, Long Island, New York, on April 14, 1918. On the ninth of May, the Division landed at Le Havre, France. Lloyd was detailed to the Postal Detachment of the 35th Division, A.P.O. 743, where he served the rest of his Army enlistment.

Lloyd was discharged from the Army on May 4, 1919, at Camp Funston, Kansas, with the rank of Sergeant.

'Army City' Garnett, Kansas August 6, 1917

My Dearest Mary,

We are in the Army now. I am sitting inside our little old tent listening to the gentle patter of the raindrops on the canvas. It began raining here this morning and it is still at it. No drill today, so I will have time to write a letter or two. We got into the city all O.K., marched up to the armory and had dinner. They have mess in the armory. We have to march back and forth to eat. Eats are pretty good so far as they have some women helping with the cooking.

Set up camp in the afternoon. Shoemaker has been Acting Corporal in our squad. We got the tent up all right under the direction of one of the old heads who has seen service on the border. Some equipment was issued in the afternoon. As my name is down well in the list, I have not received anything yet in my own name.

Corporal Hilton is staying in town so he let me have his stuff. Got pack, gun, poncho, and numerous other things I don't know what are used for. Slept on the ground last night in a tent with just an even dozen in it. Some of the fellows are staying in town at hotels, rooming houses, and private houses. Taken altogether, things are in rather poor shape as yet, but I suppose it takes a little time to get around. A few of the bunch act like a bunch of bums instead of soldiers, but they will get that taken out of them when they get to a real camp.

They got Parker Melliush for kitchen duty the first thing. Walter Anthony was stuck for guard duty last night. It must be fine walking up and down in front of a row of tents watching the other fellows sleep. One thing they did do, everybody had to quiet down at ten-thirty last night. We had a good entertainment before lights out. (We had a light, too, as some of the bunch got hold of a lantern.) A fellow in our squad by the name of Donald gets off some pretty good comedy -- original stuff, too. He is a rather rough nut, but not as bad as some of this crowd.

There was some crowd at the station yesterday, wasn't there? I think I shook hands with everybody in town three or four times. Not a very pleasant task under the circumstances, either. Well, I got so much company in here that I can't think straight. This is rather a poor excuse of a letter, but I will write again soon.

With best of love to my own little girl,

Lloyd S.

Related Topics

Military History Army