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Commissary Recalls Its Bottled Water

Pallets of Freedom's Choice bottled water stand at the Fort Belvoir, Virginia commissary. (Defense Commissary Agency/Kevin Robinson)
Pallets of Freedom's Choice bottled water stand at the Fort Belvoir, Virginia commissary. (Defense Commissary Agency/Kevin Robinson)

Do you love the commissary's new in-house brand water? Better check that label.

Officials have issued a recall for the Freedom's Choice water "due to the discovery of potential impurities that exceed the manufacturer's standards," according to a release on the Defense Commissary Agency's website.

Although officials have pulled all of the budget brand water from the shelves in stores across the system, the bottles specifically impacted by the recall have UPC 842798-10009 with Lot number STK1070518 and a "best if used by" date of Nov. 5, 2019, the release said.

Customers should return it for a full refund.

A spokesman told the Military Times that officials think the bottles were only distributed in Korea and that no one has actually gotten sick.

A list of other recalled food product notices can be viewed on the commissary's website. Food recalls are a regular occurrence for brands nationwide, but if you like eating manufactured food purchased anywhere, don't read these too closely. (Mostly unrelated: what is a "luncheon loaf" and do I want to know?)

The bottled water problem is just one of a parade of Defense Department water woes, most of which are centered around drinking water on bases nationwide.

A report issued in March found that at least 126 military bases are near or house water that contains perfluorinated compounds at potentially harmful levels. Those chemicals have been linked to both developmental delays for infants and unborn babies, and a variety of cancers.

And at Camp Pendleton a pair of documents were recently released showing that officials skipped required tests for radiation in the base's drinking water, while coliform bacteria, common to feces and sewage, was found in the water in April.

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