Vets Behind 'HITT Lockers' Roll Out Rappel Towers, O-Courses and More

Fitness equipment from the BeaverFit containers shipped by the United Service Organization-Europe is used by soldiers from 2nd Cavalry Regiment, U.S. Army Europe, at the Adazi training area near Riga, Latvia. (Photo: U.S. Army)
Fitness equipment from the BeaverFit containers shipped by the United Service Organization-Europe is used by soldiers from 2nd Cavalry Regiment, U.S. Army Europe, at the Adazi training area near Riga, Latvia. (Photo: U.S. Army)

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. -- The company that created the popular high-intensity tactical training containers that have popped up at military installations and forward operating bases around the world are taking their products to new heights.

BeaverFit's new Air Delivery Platform lets troops rappel from 60-foot towers built to mimic helicopter exits and skids. They can also practice scaling down walls or fast-roping from rooftops using the new stacked container-tower system.

"Our business started so we could support the services from a functional fitness standpoint," Bryan Studebaker with BeaverFit told Military.com here during the Modern Day Marine Expo. "... But a lot of different folks were reaching out since we were doing a lot of custom stuff with modifying containers, welding, the whole 9 yards."

BeaverFit was founded by Navy riverines and British bridge builders, a fact company owners say gives them an edge on serving the military community.

Since one of the company's mottos is, "We create what does not yet exist," Studebaker said they've been hearing people out and coming up with solutions for how to help troops train.

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The Air Force Special Operations Command's pararescue community has awarded BeaverFit multiple contracts to support some of its training needs, he said. That includes training complexes and rappel towers.

Once the containers are stacked and secured, Studebaker said the company customizes the insides depending on training needs. It has created everything from rescue elevator shafts to movable walls that mimic a more urban environment.

The company is also creating sturdy, steel-frame obstacle assault-course training systems, which would be an upgrade to some of the wood-based obstacle courses on military bases today. Those courses include breaching doors, balance beams, net walls and agility logs.

Since all of the products BeaverFit builds are modular, they don't require hefty construction contracts and can be moved around, depending on spacing needs.

"They don't have to go out and apply for a three-, four-, five-year period with funding obligations for a construction project," Studebaker said.

-- Gina Harkins can be reached at gina.harkins@military.com. Follow her on Twitter at @ginaaharkins.

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