Traumatic Brain Injury

DoD Seeks Public Input on PTSD and TBI Care

Veteran contemplating behind window.

Have you ever had an idea for a way to improve the healthcare of veterans or servicemembers? Well, if you have, the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) wants to hear from you! DCoE launched the Mental Health and TBI Care Challenge on May 4, 2015. It is a crowdsourcing effort to find and fill... more

Traumatic Brain Injury Resources

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) tracks the total number of service members throughout the Department of Defense who have been diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since the year 2000, over 313,000 service members have been diagnosed with a TBI. Following a mild TBI, it is common for individuals to experience headache, sleep disturbance, difficulty with balance, reduced attention/concentration, reduced memory abil... more

Mobile App to Diagnose Head Injuries Gets FDA OK

The new Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment tool is a mobile application designed to help medical providers identify cases of traumatic brain injury in almost any setting. (AnthroTronix, Inc. Photo)

WASHINGTON -- The new Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment is a mobile phone-based application designed to help medical providers identify cases of traumatic brain injury in almost any setting, which may help clinicians diagnose a patient in as little as five minutes. "This is what's important right now," said Lt. Col. Chessley Atchison... more

Legion Survey: PTSD/TBI Care Not Working

soldiers on hill in sunset

Two disturbing numbers stand out in The American Legion's recent survey of veterans dealing with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder: 59 percent and 30 percent. Of the more than 3,100 respondents who completed the online survey in February, 59 percent reported either feeling no improvement or worse after undergoing TBI a... more

War Vets, Researchers Seek Head Injury Answers

ST. LOUIS -- For hours on route clearance missions in southern Afghanistan, Sgt. Michael Ritchey crammed his short body into a Husky, a single-seat vehicle that loosely resembles an armored road-grader. His job was to use ground penetrating radar to detect pressure-plate bombs hidden under endless stretches of rough gravel and dirt roadways. A... more

© 2015 Military Advantage