FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Military.com Study Reveals Profound Disconnect between Employers and Transitioning Military Personnel


Sixty-one Percent of Employers Do Not Have a Complete Understanding of How Military Experiences Translate into Relevant Qualifications

Eighty-one Percent of Transitioning Service Members Feel They Are Not Fully Prepared to Enter the Civilian Workforce

SAN FRANCISCO - November 5, 2007 - Military.com today announced the results of its inaugural survey on the utilization of veteran talent in the workforce. The study explores employers' perceptions of military-experienced candidates, their intent to hire veterans and their familiarity with reservists' employment rights, as well as the sense of preparedness among transitioning military personnel. Military.com, a site within the Monster Worldwide (NASDAQ:MNST) network, is the largest military and veteran membership organization, with over eight million members and 7.4 million monthly unique visitors.1

The Employers' View
Sixty percent of hiring managers and recruiters surveyed report favorable attitudes toward employing veterans, however many face difficulties recruiting and hiring from this talent pool:

  • •  Sixty-one percent reveal they do not have a complete understanding of the qualifications ex-service members offer.
  • •  Sixty-four percent feel that veterans need additional assistance to make a successful transition into the civilian job-seeking market, with 27 percent citing the need for stronger interviewing skills.
  • •  Fifty-three percent of employers spend two percent or less of their recruitment advertising budget on targeted military hiring.

"The U.S. Military is one of the world's largest training organizations, spending $17 billion annually to provide education relevant to industries with significant employment demands, such as healthcare, engineering, and IT," said Tom Aiello, vice president for Military.com. "However, because their resumes and experiences differ from traditional candidates, it can be challenging for hiring managers to immediately appreciate the value they bring."

The study also revealed that many employers are largely uninformed about the legal obligations concerning those employees who are reservists or members of the National Guard. Thirty-six percent of employers surveyed were unaware that they must provide a returning veteran the same job or an equivalent position, according to rules set by The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA). Additionally, more than half of employers surveyed reported that they would not know how to handle service members' medical insurance benefits.

The Transitioning Service Members' View
Eighty-one percent of transitioning military personnel surveyed reveal that they do not feel fully prepared for the process of entering the job market. Of those who feel unprepared:

  • •  Seventy-two percent feel unprepared to negotiate salary and benefits.
  • •  Seventy-six percent report an inability to effectively translate their military skills to civilian terms.
  • •  Fifty-seven percent are unsure of how to network professionally.

"The disconnect between transitioning military personnel and interested employers can be easily resolved," said Aiello. "There are many online resources available to address these concerns, including government initiatives and private sector services. Additionally, Military.com's Veteran Career Network, skills translator and resume builder are tools to help bridge the gap between employer and veteran."

For more information about programs and services, including the "Employers Guide to Hiring Veterans," or additional details regarding the survey findings, please visit http://www.military.com/veteransday.

Survey Methodology
The findings presented in this report are the results of telephone interviews and a nationwide online survey conducted by Military.com between August and September 2007. The research sample consisted of 287 recruiters and hiring managers from a cross section of U.S. organizations representing small- to large-size firms and 4,442 military or veteran respondents. This survey is not scientific and reflects the opinions of only those respondents who have chosen to participate.

About Monster Worldwide
Monster Worldwide, Inc. (NASDAQ: MNST), parent company of Monster(R), the premier global online employment solution for more than a decade, strives to bring people together to advance their lives. With a local presence in key markets in North America, Europe, and Asia, Monster works for everyone by connecting employers with quality job seekers at all levels and by providing personalized career advice to consumers globally. Through online media sites and services, Monster delivers vast, highly targeted audiences to advertisers. Monster Worldwide is a member of the S&P 500 Index and the NASDAQ 100. To learn more about Monster's industry-leading products and services, visit www.monster.com. More information about Monster Worldwide is available at www.monsterworldwide.com.

About Military.com
Military.com is the nation's largest online military destination serving over eight million members, including active duty personnel, reservists, guard members, retirees, veterans, family members, defense workers and those considering military careers. Military.com enables the 30 million Americans with military affinity to access their benefits, advance their careers, enjoy military discounts, and stay connected for life. Military.com develops efficient affinity marketing and communications programs for government agencies and companies serving this market. Military.com is a subsidiary of Monster Worldwide, Inc. More information is available at www.military.com.

Special Note: Safe Harbor Statement Under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: Except for historical information contained herein, the statements made in this release constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Such forward-looking statements involve certain risks and uncertainties, including statements regarding Monster Worldwide, Inc.'s strategic direction, prospects and future results. Certain factors, including factors outside of Monster Worldwide's control, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in the forward- looking statements, including economic and other conditions in the markets in which Monster Worldwide operates, risks associated with acquisitions, competition, seasonality and the other risks discussed in Monster Worldwide's Form 10-K and other filings made with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

1 comScore Media Metrix, September 2007


Contact:
Elizabeth Lutz
Weber Shandwick for Military.com
617-520-7092
elutz@webershandwick.com


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