Under the Radar

5 Video Games Veterans Should Co-Op With Their Kids

Kids seem to grow up so fast, even faster when we're deployed. It takes time for every military parent to reconnect with our children after being away for long periods of time. Adults are concerned with the endless cycle of responsibilities in our careers, marriage, and budgeting. Children on the other hand are concerned with missing you.

Phone and video calls may be enough for us but it may not be enough for them. The burdens we carry are worth it when we see their smiles, living in safe homes, and getting a good education. Little ones are immersed in a more digital reality than millennial parents when they were their age.

The bright side is that we can connect with them over games they're interested in and you'll be surprised how much you remember about gaming if you aren't already playing solo. From their perspective, winning with your team is awesome — but winning with your dad is epic.

Minecraft

The easiest way to describe "Minecraft" is that it's digital Legos. It was developed by Mojang and has three modes: Survival, Creative, and Adventure. This game can be played on any platform or phone and has online capabilities.

Survival is straightforward where you gather supplies and build things to help you weather the elements or defeat enemies. Creative Mode makes you immune to damage and have access to every block (piece) in the game. In Adventure mode most blocks cannot be destroyed and it has a more roleplaying type of element to it, like "Skyrim" but with training wheels.

"Minecraft" has been used to teach kids about programming, coding, and Modding (creating custom characters, buildings, and effects) in schools as well. This game can be as easy or complicated as you want it to be. You'll be surprised how fast they learn when taught in gamer speak.

Everything the light touches is our kingdom. (Mojang)

Cuphead

"Cuphead" is a sidescroller game developed by StudioMDHR with Disneyesque graphics. The game was completely hand drawn to resemble the iconic animation styles of the 1920's/1930's and a complementary soundtrack. It doesn't support online gameplay but if you've ever played "Contra" or "Megaman," you're going to kick ass at this game.

The levels have two modes: simple and regular. Boss fights and their patterns of attack change with the game difficulty. You can teach your child about strategy, attack pattern recognition, nurture hand-eye coordination, and teamwork. Together, your young protege will be unstoppable in Metroid, Mario, and Castlevania games.

Cuphead and Mugman utilizing the talking guns concept. (StudioMDHR)

Pokemon - Let's Go Pikachu/Eevee

Nintendo has the lion's share on the nostalgia market and it's console sales spike every time a new Pokemon game releases. If you remember picking your favorite starter in Professor Oak's lab, you're going to love going down memory lane with your tiny pokemon-master-in-training.

In the ancient days of Gamboy Pocket/Color, we had to battle and trade over a physical cable that connected our hand-held devices. Nowadays all trading and battling is done over the internet.

The latest game is a remake of "Pokemon Yellow" so you can still keep it old school with the original 151. There are a ton of differences from the "Red" and "Blue" but it will still hit your right in the feels.

Fortnite

"Fortnite" is an online first/third person shooter in a battle royal arena. It's like the old school shooters, "007 GoldenEye" for example, where you find random weapons on the ground with the added twist that the map gets smaller.

There is a very high chance your child is already playing this game; it's whats trendy with the younger player base. If you're unsure if they play this game just turn to them right now and ask if they can do a "Fortnite" dance for you.

It has several game modes but the most common ones are team or solo battles. Players are able to build impromptu bases out of wood, cement, and metal to give them cover when fighting. This is a game where your old "Halo" badassery will elevate you to near God status in the eyes of your kids.

Dad: "Loot the gear." Daughter: "There's someone there." *gunshots* Dad: "Loot the gear." (Epic Games)

PUBG

"Player Unknown's Battle Grounds" (PUBG) is another battle royal game with the same principles as "Fortnite," which is also this game's competitor. The key differences are that you won't be able to build bases and the graphics are more teen/adult oriented. "Call of Duty" is out gran' ol' man. "PUBG" is in.

"My dad can outsnipe your dad." (PUBG Corporation)

Regardless of the games you choose to play, the important thing is that you have fun and bond with your children. We're all busy and it's hard to understand or care about what they think is important because you know what responsibilities really are important.

When you play games with your kids, you'll know what they're talking about when they're excited about something — and they'll know you give a sh*t. I still remember when I played Super Nintendo with my old man. Give your kids the gift my dad gave me: the precious memories of owning everyone else.


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Why the 'Good Cookie' isn't a guaranteed medal

We Are The Mighty (WATM) celebrates service with stories that inspire. WATM is made in Hollywood by veterans. It's military life presented like never before. Check it out at We Are the Mighty.

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