Trial Delayed for Woman Linked to Fort Hood Soldier Vanessa Guillen's Slaying

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casket of Army Spc. Vanessa Guillen
The casket of Army Spc. Vanessa Guillen is viewed at a public memorial service on Friday, Aug. 14, 2020, in Houston. (Marie D. De Jesus/Houston Chronicle via AP)

AUSTIN, Texas -- A federal judge has delayed the trial for Cecily Aguilar, a woman accused by authorities of helping to dismember and dispose of Fort Hood soldier Vanessa Guillen in April.

Aguilar's hearing set for Monday was instead pushed back to Nov. 30, according to officials from the U.S. District Court, Western District of Texas, Waco Division.

Judge Alan Albright ordered the trial to be reset after a request by Aguilar's defense team for extra time to prepare their case.

The order continued: "The failure to grant such a continuance would unreasonably deny the defendant's counsel the reasonable time necessary for effective preparation, taking into account the exercise of due diligence."

Aguilar, a 22-year-old Killeen civilian employed at a local gas station before her arrest, is charged with three felony counts of conspiracy to tamper with evidence. She pleaded not guilty on July 14.

Army officials accuse Aguilar of helping her boyfriend, Fort Hood Spc. Aaron David Robinson, cover up the April 22 slaying of Guillen.

Authorities believe Robinson, who died July 1 after shooting himself as Killeen police tried to detain him for questioning, struck 20-year-old Guillen with a hammer as they worked together in a weapons room on post.

Army officials have not publicly given a possible motive for the killing.

Authorities say Robinson toted Guillen's body off post in a large protective case used to carry weapons.

Burned pieces of the same style of box were found near the Leon River in Bell County, where construction workers found Guillen, authorities have said.

U.S. Attorney Mark Frazier alleged during Aguilar's July hearing that she not only helped Robinson dispose of Guillen's remains, she also deleted Google accounts belonging to her and Robinson as a way to get rid of evidence.

Aguilar also called one person from jail, who was not identified in court, and asked them to delete her Facebook page, Frazier said.

If convicted, Aguilar could face up to 20 years in prison with a maximum fine of $250,000.

This article is written by Heather Osbourne from Austin American-Statesman and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the Industry Dive publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@industrydive.com.

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