Military Seeks Further Restrictions of Airspace near Clear Air Force Station

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Clear Air Force Station, Alaska, deep in America’s last frontier, is marked by a small sign and secluded by icy roads which are often difficult to travel in the harsh winter weather. (U.S. Air Force photo/Shawn Nickel)
Clear Air Force Station, Alaska, deep in America’s last frontier, is marked by a small sign and secluded by icy roads which are often difficult to travel in the harsh winter weather. (U.S. Air Force photo/Shawn Nickel)

FAIRBANKS, Alaska — The U.S. military is seeking to expand restricted airspace around Alaska's Clear Air Force Station.

The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reported Sunday that the U.S. Missile Defense Agency's plans for a new Long Range Discrimination Radar include a proposal to increase restrictions beyond those of the existing radar facility north of Healy.

Public meetings to inform pilots and others about the proposed changes are scheduled this week in Anchorage, Anderson and Fairbanks.

Officials say the agency already prohibits airplanes from flying in the immediate vicinity of the station about 112 miles (180 kilometers) southwest of Fairbanks.

Related: NORAD May Ramp Up North American Surveillance amid Rising Threats from Russia

Officials say additional restricted airspace is needed at Clear to protect aircraft from a high-intensity radiated field from the new system.

Owner and pilot groups say they are evaluating the proposal.

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