Trump Says He's Hosting 'A Salute to America' on July 4 at the Lincoln Memorial

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ational recording artists perform at the 2018 A Capitol Fourth rehearsals at U.S. Capitol, West Lawn on July 3, 2018 in Washington, D.C. This time-honored 38-year tradition places attendees and viewers front and center for America's largest birthday party celebrating 242 years of independence. (Reese Brown/Department of Defense Photo)
National recording artists perform at the 2018 A Capitol Fourth rehearsals at U.S. Capitol, West Lawn on July 3, 2018 in Washington, D.C. This time-honored 38-year tradition places attendees and viewers front and center for America's largest birthday party celebrating 242 years of independence. (Reese Brown/Department of Defense Photo)

"Your favorite President" is hosting an Independence Day celebration, and we're all invited.

President Trump excitedly announced on Twitter Sunday that he is throwing "one of the biggest gatherings in the history of Washington D.C. on July 4" and he's a naming it "A Salute to America."

Trump's party will take place at the Lincoln Memorial and he promises "major fireworks display, entertainment and an address by your favorite President, me!"

It's unclear if Trump's Independence Day event will coincide with the annual A Capitol Fourth celebration on the west lawn of the United States Capitol. That also features fireworks and musical performances and attracts a half-million spectators.

The actual size of the President's July 4 "biggest gathering" will likely be of interest to head counters.

During his 2017 inauguration, Trump declared he'd had a "perhaps record-setting turnout." That claim was quickly debunked.

Arizona State University Prof. Steve Doig told the Atlantic "the claim that this is the largest ever is ludicrous on its face."

British crowd science expert Keith Still estimated the crowd that came to see Trump sworn into office was one-third the size of the crowd that witnessed President Barack Obama's commencement. The Guardian reported in September that Trump's inaugural team had cropped photos to make the modest crowd appear larger.

Then-White House press secretary Sean Spicer, who aggressively insisted that crowd was larger than it was, later admitted he was wrong.

There was no mention of a military parade in the President's Sunday morning tweet. Trump had pushed for such an event last year, despite the objections of veterans groups, pundits and politicians who mocked the idea as a political stunt.

The President relented in August -- six months after news of a military parade broke -- when a Pentagon spokesman said the White House and Department of Defense announced an agreement "to explore opportunities in 2019."

The President attended the New York Military Academy in Cornwall, Orange County, but avoided serving during the Vietnam War when he was granted five draft deferments.

This article is written by Brian Niemietz from New York Daily News and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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