Soldiers Keep Getting Free Burgers, But Army Wants to Keep It a Secret

(Getty Images)
(Getty Images)

There's an old saying that "no good deed goes unpunished."

Whoever penned that line may work at Fort Carson, which has banned the media from covering a local tradition of handing out hamburgers to troops when they arrive home from overseas.

For years, local volunteers have handed out the burgers to troops plane-side at the military's terminal at the Colorado Springs Airport. It's a tradition that goes back to some of the first troops coming back from Iraq in 2004.

The Army is certainly a fan of the free food, but the brass at the post fears that allowing news coverage of the ritual would violate federal regulations that prevent the government from endorsing businesses or charities.

It's a regulation that has been enforced in spotty fashion over the years. Fort Carson's ties with the Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo and other troop-boosting events have been public and the press has been encouraged to attend.

But the hamburgers are somehow different, the post maintains. So when about five-dozen soldiers came home from Afghanistan on Thursday as part of a midtour rotation, the hamburger-handing was done under a veil of Army secrecy.

Let's cut some red tape right here: The hamburgers in question came from McDonald's, the volunteers are from local charity The Home Front Cares, and the soldiers seem to enjoy them. But, remember, keep it on the down-low.

In other military news, the Home Builders Institute kicked off a program at Fort Carson last week, aimed at turning troops into tradesmen. The initiative will help train and certify transitioning troops in construction skills before they leave the Army.

"HBI's program uniquely supports transitioning military and veterans at every stage of the employment continuum -- successfully connecting, assessing, training, certifying, and placing them in high-growth construction careers, and charting participant progress for a minimum of one year," the builder's group said in a news release.

The construction program adds to a full slate of job training now available at the post for troops who will soon hang up their uniforms. Other offerings include internships, apprenticeships and a program from the Department of Veterans Affairs that trains troops for claims administration jobs.

The military says getting troops good jobs after they serve helps military recruiting efforts and saves the Pentagon piles of cash. The Defense Department has paid up to $1.1 billion per year in unemployment claims for troops who couldn't find work after their enlistments expired.

Unlike the hamburgers, Fort Carson publicized the Home Builders Institute effort.

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This article is written by Tom Roeder from The Gazette (Colorado Springs, Colo.) and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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