AppNexus Test Article

  • FILE - In this Dec. 21, 2016, file photo, family physician Leslie Hayes listens for a fetal heartbeat while attending to a 40-year-old mother, not seen, who is being treated for an addiction to heroin with the anti-craving medication Subutext, at the El Centro Family Health medical clinic in Espanola, N.M. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee, File)
  • Cher Ami, the carrier pigeon which carried a message from the Lost Battalion to the 77th Division on Oct. 4, 1918. The pigeon survived German rifle fire to carry a message calling on American artillery to stop firing because it was hitting American Soldiers. After Cher Ami died she was stuffed and is currently in the collection of the Smithsonian Institute. (National Archives)
    Cher Ami, the carrier pigeon which carried a message from the Lost Battalion to the 77th Division on Oct. 4, 1918. The pigeon survived German rifle fire to carry a message calling on American artillery to stop firing because it was hitting American Soldiers. After Cher Ami died she was stuffed and is currently in the collection of the Smithsonian Institute. (National Archives)
  • FILE - This May 10, 2007 file photo shows actor Seymour Cassel at the premiere of "The Wendell Baker Story" in Beverly Hills, Calif. Cassel, who appeared frequently in the films of John Cassavetes and Wes Anderson, has died. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- One of World War I’s most heroic battlefield story features a bookish lawyer, a millionaire who charged up San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt, a carrier pigeon that’s now in the Smithsonian, and draftee Soldiers from New York City who served in the 77th Division.

One hundred years later, the story of the 550 men of the “Lost Battalion” –American Soldiers trapped behind enemy lines in the Argonne forest– still resonates.

It’s been the subject of countless books, a 2001 TV movie, and a 2016 song by the Swedish heavy metal band Sabaton.

But the “Lost Battalion” wasn’t actually lost, nor was it even a battalion.

Major Charles Whittlesey, the commander, knew right where his men were located. It was their higher headquarters who weren’t sure where they were.

And Whittlesey was only the commander of the 1st Battalion of the 308th Infantry Regiment. The regiment’s 2nd Battalion was also present, along with a company from the 307th Infantry Regiment. But as senior officer, Whittlesey took charge.

The regiments were part of the 77th Division. The division was a “National Army” division made up of drafted men who were not in the Regular Army and not part of the National Guard.

Show Full Article

Related Topics

d

Related Video