Hawaii Suspends Missile Siren Tests after Mistaken Alert

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2018, file photo provided by Civil Beat, cars drive past a highway sign that says "MISSILE ALERT ERROR THERE IS NO THREAT" on the H-1 Freeway in Honolulu. (Cory Lum/Civil Beat via AP, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2018, file photo provided by Civil Beat, cars drive past a highway sign that says "MISSILE ALERT ERROR THERE IS NO THREAT" on the H-1 Freeway in Honolulu. (Cory Lum/Civil Beat via AP, File)

HONOLULU — Hawaii authorities won't sounds sirens warning of a nuclear missile attack during a monthly test this week.

The decision comes after an agency employee last month mistakenly sent cellphone and broadcast alerts warning of an incoming ballistic missile.

Instead Hawaii Emergency Management Agency officials only plan to test a separate siren that warns of tsunamis and other natural disasters. The test is scheduled for Thursday.

Brig. Gen. Kenneth Hara last week recommended that the agency suspend its missile attack outreach until it prepares a report on how the state should respond to a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear attack or accident.

Hara didn't recommended suspending the missile siren tests. But Hawaii state Department of Defense spokesman Lt. Col. Charles Anthony says the agency decided to stop them as well.

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