Marines Sandy Conditions a Factor in Deadly Aircraft Crash

In this May 17, 2015 photo, a man and woman look toward smoke rising from a Marine Corps Osprey aircraft after making a hard landing on Bellows Air Force Station near Waimanalo, Hawaii. (Zane Dulin via AP)
In this May 17, 2015 photo, a man and woman look toward smoke rising from a Marine Corps Osprey aircraft after making a hard landing on Bellows Air Force Station near Waimanalo, Hawaii. (Zane Dulin via AP)

HONOLULU -- A military investigation has found a U.S. Marine Corps hybrid aircraft that crashed in Hawaii this year, killing two Marines, flew in sandy or dusty conditions for an extended period before its engine stalled.

The investigation found the stalled left engine put the MV-22 Osprey in an unavoidable freefall.

The airplane-and-helicopter hybrid crashed at a military base outside Honolulu in May with 21 Marines and a Navy corpsman on board.

U.S. Marine Forces, Pacific said in a statement Monday the pilots didn't violate any regulations or flight standards. But investigators say a proper risk assessment should have prompted the pilots to choose a different flight path or landing site to avoid dust or sand.

Investigators are recommending changes to help pilots make better decisions in similar situations.

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Marine Corps Accidents Osprey