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Cutter Key Largo, Sister Ship Tow Fishing Vessel Home

The Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba is at its home port in Boston Sept. 15, 2015 after a 61-day fisheries patrol in the waters off New England. (U.S. Coast Guard)
The Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba is at its home port in Boston Sept. 15, 2015 after a 61-day fisheries patrol in the waters off New England. (U.S. Coast Guard)

The Gloucester-based fishing vessel Orion had to be towed back to its home port during the weekend after mechanical problems left it without power Saturday about 40 miles south of Cape Ann.

The U.S. Coast Guard said the Orion crew contacted the Sector Boston station at 10:40 a.m. Saturday via the VHF-16 distress channel and reported the 79-foot trawler, one of three Gloucester-based boats owned by Giuseppe Dimaio, was disabled due to engine failure.

The Coast Guard dispatched the 110-foot cutter Key Largo from Station Gloucester after the Orion was unsuccessful in hailing another vessel to come to its aid. The cutter arrived at the Orion's location at about 4 p.m. Saturday, attached a line and began towing the Orion and the five fishermen on board back to Gloucester, the Coast Guard said.

About 7:45 p.m. Saturday, the Coast Guard transferred the tow line to the Gloucester fishing vessel Captain Joe, which also is owned by Dimaio, and the Captain Joe completed the tow back to Gloucester.

Dimaio could not be reached Monday for comment.

"Communication was the key from the beginning to the end on this case," Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Jess Himel, a watchstander at Sector Boston, said in a statement. "Coordinating a successful tow that involves three different crews only works if communication is clear."

The Orion on Monday was tied up at the Jodrey State Fish Pier.

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Cutters and Patrol Boats