Gitmo Officer: Limits On Female Guards Puts Mission at Risk

In this Dec. 6, 2006, file photo, a shackled detainee is transported by guards away from his annual Administrative Review Board hearing with U.S. officials, at Camp Delta detention center, Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. Brennan Llinsley/AP
In this Dec. 6, 2006, file photo, a shackled detainee is transported by guards away from his annual Administrative Review Board hearing with U.S. officials, at Camp Delta detention center, Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. Brennan Llinsley/AP

FORT MEADE, Md. — An Army officer at Guantanamo Bay says court orders barring female soldiers from jobs requiring physical contact with Muslim detainees create a safety risk at the U.S. military prison in Cuba by limiting his staffing options.

The commander of Camp 7, a top-secret housing unit for high-security detainees, testified anonymously Wednesday at a pretrial hearing for Abd al-Hadi al-Iraqi. The Associated Press covered the hearing from a video feed at Fort Meade near Baltimore.

The government is contesting a military judge's interim order barring female guards from escorting al-Hadi to attorney-client meetings and court hearings. Al-Hadi contends his Muslim faith prohibits physical contact with females other than wives and close relatives.

A similar court order pertains to the five defendants in the Sept. 11 attacks.

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