SpaceX to Launch Falcon 9 Rocket from Cape Canaveral

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches Starlink at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. on May 23, 2019. The Starlink mission put 60 satellites into orbit and aims to build a constellations of satellites to bring internet capabilities to areas that do not have or have limited internet. (Alex Preisser/U.S. Air Force)
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches Starlink at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. on May 23, 2019. The Starlink mission put 60 satellites into orbit and aims to build a constellations of satellites to bring internet capabilities to areas that do not have or have limited internet. (Alex Preisser/U.S. Air Force)

As launch day moves closer and closer, weather looks promising for Wednesday's mission.

Scheduled to lift off at 12:51 p.m. from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Launch Complex 40, SpaceX is sending its Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station with science experiments, crew supplies and hardware onboard as part of NASA's Commercial Resupply Services program.

Weather is currently 90% "go" for launch, as calculated by the U.S. Air Force with the primary concern being winds during liftoff, according to the 45th Weather Squadron.

"The primary concern is higher surface winds lingering into the launch window Wednesday," according to the 45th Weather Squadron.

The backup opportunity, which is Thursday, has weather at 80% "go" with the primary concern being low-level clouds.

For this launch, SpaceX will send several science experiments to the space station including:

Following this launch, Boeing is set to send its Starliner capsule atop United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket no earlier than 7:47 a.m. Dec. 17 from Launch Complex 41 to the space station as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program.

It will be the uncrewed orbital flight test for the aerospace company as teams get ready to once again send astronauts to space from U.S. soil. SpaceX already conducted the uncrewed flight test of its Crew Dragon spacecraft back in March.

Contact Jaramillo at 321-242-3668 or antoniaj@floridatoday.com. Follow her on Twitter at @AntoniaJ_11.

This article is written by Antonia Jaramillo, Florida Today from Daytona Beach News - Journal, The and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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