Mexican Senate, Candidates Slam Deployment of US Guardsmen

Presidential candidate Ricardo Anaya, with the Forward for Mexico Coalition which unites the National Action Party (PAN) and the Democratic Revolution Party (PRD), waves to supporters after formalizing his candidacy before the National Electoral Institute in Mexico City, Sunday, March 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)
Presidential candidate Ricardo Anaya, with the Forward for Mexico Coalition which unites the National Action Party (PAN) and the Democratic Revolution Party (PRD), waves to supporters after formalizing his candidacy before the National Electoral Institute in Mexico City, Sunday, March 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)

MEXICO CITY — Mexican senators and presidential candidates put aside differences to condemn U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to deploy National Guard troops to the border.

The country's Senate passed a resolution Wednesday calling for the suspension of cooperation on illegal immigration and drug trafficking in retaliation for Trump's move.

Presidential candidate Ricardo Anaya went further, saying Mexico should limit anti-terrorism cooperation until the National Guard is withdrawn. Anaya is the candidate of a left-right coalition in the country's July 1 presidential election.

Ruling-party candidate Jose Antonio Meade said that "independently of our political differences, it is time for all the presidential candidates to unite in defense of the sovereignty and dignity of the nation ... to reject and repudiate thus kind of measure."

Others took Trump's decision with a grain of salt after the Mexican government said guard members "will not carry weapons or have immigration or customs duties."

The newspaper El Heraldo said in a headline Thursday "U.S. deploys National Guard ... tin soldiers."

Meanwhile, presidential front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Mexico should send a line of white-clad peace demonstrators to the border.

"Let's not get ahead of ourselves, this is still just political propaganda, there still isn't anything to concern our country," Lopez Obrador said.

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