New Marine Granted American Citizenship During Ceremony

Pvt. Daniel Ramirez Rodriguez, Platoon 2050, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, earned U.S. citizenship July 13, 2017, on Parris Island, S.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo/Lance Cpl. Maximiliano Bavastro)
Pvt. Daniel Ramirez Rodriguez, Platoon 2050, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, earned U.S. citizenship July 13, 2017, on Parris Island, S.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo/Lance Cpl. Maximiliano Bavastro)

Mexico-born Marine Pvt. Daniel Ramirez Rodriguez was sworn in as an American citizen one day and then graduated boot camp at Parris Island the next.

The Cullman resident was among 19 new Marines to take the oath of citizenship during a naturalization ceremony July 13. He then graduated with his 475 fellow Marines of Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, and November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion on July 14.

Rodriguez persevered through 70 training days while passing each of the seven graduation requirements. And before earning citizenship, he had to demonstrate knowledge of the English language and American government, show good moral character and take the Oath of Allegiance to the U.S. Constitution.

Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 12 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry -- level enlisted training for approximately 49 percent of male recruits and 100 percent of female recruits in the Marine Corps.

Rodriguez is enjoying a 10-day stretch of leave before reporting to the next step in entry-level training at the School of Infantry at Camp Geiger, N.C. There, he will go on for specialized training.

"United States citizenship is the greatest honor we grant (at the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services)," said Brenda Washington, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.

"For these Marines, today's naturalization ceremony represents their final step in their journey to American citizenship. Their path to citizenship is especially remarkable because they first pledge themselves to support and defend the United States before choosing to become American citizens."

This article is written by Tiffeny Owens from The Cullman Times, Ala. and was legally licensed via the Tribune Content Agency through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

Show Full Article

Related Topics

Marine Corps Topics