Connect
Get the

Early Brief

Sign-up
Newsletter

Contributor

About

This article is provided courtesy of Stars and Stripes, which got its start as a newspaper for Union troops during the Civil War, and has been published continuously since 1942 in Europe and 1945 in the Pacific. Stripes reporters have been in the field with American soldiers, sailors and airmen in World War II, Korea, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Bosnia and Kosovo, and are now on assignment in the Middle East.

Stars and Stripes has one of the widest distribution ranges of any newspaper in the world. Between the Pacific and European editions, Stars and Stripes services over 50 countries where there are bases, posts, service members, ships, or embassies.

Stars and Stripes Website

Navy Ship Collides With Vessel

Porter collision 428x285

The U.S. Navy reported Sunday a collision between a guided missile destroyer and a large Japanese-owned merchant vessel near the Strait of Hormuz. There were no injuries.

The collision left a gaping hole in the starboard side of USS Porter, The Associated Press reported. The collision happened between the USS Porter and the Panamanian-flagged bulk oil tanker M/V Otowasan about 1 a.m. local time, according to a Navy news release.

Overall damage to the Porter is being evaluated, but the ship is able to operate under its own power, the Navy release stated. There were no reports of spills or leakages from either the USS Porter or the Otowasan, AP reported.

No personnel on either vessel were injured in the collision, reported by the Navy as "not combat related."

The incident is under investigation.

The USS Porter, homeported in Norfolk, Va., is on a scheduled deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.

A video showing damage to the Porter following the collision has been posted to the 5th Fleet's Facebook page.

The Strait of Hormuz, located at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, is where one-fifth of the world's oil is routed, AP reported. Tensions have risen there over Iran's threats to block tanker traffic in retaliation for tighter sanctions by the West.

Three years ago, The USS Hartford, a nuclear-powered submarine based in Groton, Conn., collided in the Strait with the USS New Orleans, a San Diego-based amphibious ship, according to an AP report.

The New Orleans' fuel tank was ruptured and 15 sailors on the Hartford sustained minor injuries. The collision caused $2.3 million in damage to the New Orleans, and the cost so far of repairs to the Hartford is $102.6 million, AP reported.

The commanding officer was relieved of his duties and the sub's chief of the boat, an adviser to the commanding officer, was reassigned. Several crew members were punished, AP reported.

Related Topics

© 2014 Military Advantage
A Monster Company.