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Senate Won't Order McChrystal Testimony
Associated Press  |  October 02, 2009
WASHINGTON -- The Senate has rejected an effort by Sen. John McCain to force the field commander in Afghanistan to testify before Congress by mid-November.

The Arizona Republican wanted to require Gen. Stanley McChrystal, who's advocating sending as many as 40,000 additional U.S. troops to Afghanistan, to testify before Congress by Nov. 15.

McCain was on the losing end of a party-line 59-40 vote. Defense Secretary Robert Gates strongly opposed the idea, telling lawmakers that it would be inappropriate for McChrystal and other senior officials to testify on the advice given President Barack Obama while he is weighing a major decision on Afghanistan.

Democrats instead approved a plan requiring hearings after Obama's new strategy on Afghanistan is announced.

McChrystal warned in a confidential report that was leaked to the Washington Post that he needs more troops as soon as possible. The window is closing on chances of success in Afghanistan, according to his assessment, and unless more troops are put in the Afghan War "will likely result in failure," the post quoted him as saying.

Meanwhile, a Florida congressman is suggesting that some generals may resign or retire early unless the president puts in additional forces.

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., is being quoted in The Hill newspaper as saying the current strategy in Afghanistan is not working and that: "Our generals are telling us that it puts our Soldiers at risk."

The Hill, citing Ryan's interview with Washington Times Radio, said Ryan warned that commanders in the field and at Central Command might decide that if they are not being given the troops they need to win, why stay on?

Military.com contributed to this report.

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