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Histories for 29th Infantry Regimental Association




SOLDIER'S PASSING MARKS END OF AN ERA:
THE 29TH REGIMENT SAYS GOODBYE TO ONE OF THEIR FINEST By Frank C. Plass The 29th Infantry Regiment suffered the loss of a special friend and soldier of the Regiment. Their Honorary Regimental Colonel, Colonel John C. Hughes, Corn Cob #6 as he was known throughout his military service. Colonel Hughes, age 79 of Herrin, Illinois, passed away on January 20th in Boulder, Colorado. Until late September 2001, when he became ill, Colonel Hughes always remained active in the Regiment and was a standing fixture at all Regimental functions. "He was and still is a source of pride to the soldiers of the Regiment. The soldiers were attracted to him as a leader and as a person." Said Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Tulak the Regimental Deputy Commander. Through the support and admiration of his peers, Colonel Hughes was selected September 23, 1996 to be the Honorary Regimental Colonel. Colonel Tulak described the combat veteran of three wars as a humorous, outgoing and personable man, armed with stories, frightening and funny, he shared with the soldiers and their families. When Colonel Hughes was in command, his soldiers always called him Corn Cob #6. Because that was his call sign and he always smoked his corncob pipe. Colonel Hughes entered the military service in October 1942 as an enlisted man in the Infantry. He was later commissioned a second lieutenant in the Infantry in 1943. I first met Lieutenant Hughes in Okinawa and served with him in Korea as part of the 1st Battalion, 29th Infantry Regiment. Later, Lieutenant Hughes was promoted to Captain and Commander of Bravo Company. Colonel Hughes was a highly respected leader throughout his military life. He was a real source of inspiration to the soldiers of our Army. He understood and taught others to understand that soldiers should always be treated with dignity and respect. He understood that what young people longed for and needed was no different than what he stood for. A sense of something greater than

Posted by Arthur Tulak
Oct 08 2005 07:09:57:000PM




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