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Histories for 51st Signal Battalion




51st Signal Bn.
The battalion would leave Seattle on 17 August 1950 aboard the Fred Ainsworth and would arrive in Japan on 18 August 1950. It would stage in Japan for only two weeks where it was reorganized as the 51st Signal Battalion Corps. It was then moved to Korea where it would support the Eight Army and more specifically I Corps landing there on 16 September 1950. 51st Signal Battalion Honors and Campaign Participation Credit World War I: Lorraine 1918; St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne World War II: Sicily (with arrowhead); Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; North Apennines; Po Valley Korean War: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953 Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait; Cease-Fire Decorations Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for EUROPEAN THEATER Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for KOREA 1950-1951 Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for KOREA 1953-1954 Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation for KOREA 1950-1953 Company B additionally entitled to: Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for KOREA 1952 The unit was originally consituted on 3 June 1916 into the Regular Army as the 5th Telegraph Battalion, Signal Corp and organized on 12 July 1917 at Monmouth Park, New Jersey. On 2 August 1917 the battalion moved to Camp Alfred Vail, New Jersey where it was redesignated on 10 October 1917 as the 55th Telegraph Battalion, Signal Corps. The battalion would then deploy to France to join the American Expeditionary Force. During World War I, the battalion would participate on three campaigns to include: Lorraine, St. Mihiel, and the Meuse-Argonne. The battalion would return to New York on 27 June 1919 and move to Camp Vail, New Jersey. The battalion would be redesignated on 18 March 1921 as the 51st Signal Battalion. It would move to Fort Monmouth, New Jersey on 5 August 1925. The battalion would remain there during the thirties with training conducted at Pine Camp, New York, Allegan, Michigan, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Fort Bragg, North Carolina and Plattsburg, New York. The Hindenburg disaster of May 6, 1937 provided an unexpected opportunity for the 51st Signal Battalion to test its emergency deployment plan. When the giant German airship exploded at its Lakehurst N.A.S. mooring, the naval commandant asked for help from the Fort Monmouth commandant, who dispatched a motor convoy from the 51st Signal Battalion. The signalmen guarded the smoldering wreckage of the dirigible, keeping away the crowd of onlookers who rushed to the scene while investigators probed the debris. The battalion would participate on the Louisiana Maneuvers during 1940. The battalion would leave Fort Monmouth for the last time prior to deploying for Europe on 16 April 1941 and would see additional training at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, Camp Blanding, Florida, and Camp Stewart, Georga. It would deploy from New York aboard the John Ericson on 4 March 1943 bound for North Africa. From North Africa, the battalion would stage and would participate in the invasion on Sicily, and then support forces in Italy arriving there on 6 October 1943. During this time, the battalion would credit for four campaigns to include: Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno, North Apennines, and the Po Valley. The battalion also received the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Europe. The battalion would arrive back in Boston on 22 August 1945 and would move to Camp Shelby, Mississippi where it would remain until 22 February 1946. From there the battalion would move to Fort Polk, Louisiana then Fort Meade, Maryland and would remain until August 1950. During the Korean War the battalion supported I Corps in ten campaigns and would receive two Meritorious Unit Commendations and the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation. the battalion would remain in Korea after the hostilities as part of the Eighth Army.It was reorganized on 13 February 1955 as the 51st Signal Battalion. In 1974, the first women soldiers arrived. Within two years there were 56 female enlisted and 2 female officers. The battalion remained in Korea until16 March 1981. Then it moved to Ludwigsburg, Germany where it supported VII Corps. "Operation Desert Shield" On November 8,1990 the battalion was altered for immediate deployment to Saudi Arabia. Within 3 weeks it had personnel on the ground in Saudi Arabia. While the war only lasted 100 hours, it was the 15 of April, 1991, before they returned to Germany. At noon April 15, 1993. the 51st lowered the American flag for the last time in Germany On April 16, 1993,the 51st's Colors were duly unfurled at Fort Bragg, North Carolina and for the first time it was commanded by a female, LTC Velma L. Richardson. On 1 October 1993 the unit was redesignated the 51st Signal Battalion (Airborne).For the last 5 years, the 51st focused on training, maintenance and standard force readiness for overseas deployments from Fort Bragg. The 51st is a proud unit filled with a great history and traditions. They will continue to strive for excellence. To add onto the history. Since the Global War on Terrorism has started, 51st Signal Battalion (Airborne) has played an active part. C/51st sent the CCP (Corps Contingency Package) Platoon along with 327th Signal Bn to Afghanistan. They did a 6 month rotation from May until Oct 2002 there. We also have had a Platoon from B/51st attached to 123rd Signal (3ID). They were in Kuwait from September 2002 until August 2003. Once Operation IRAQI FREEDOM started they moved into Iraq. They are still over there in support of the war. Last October, the Battalion was prepared to deploy to Afghanistan for OEF, a week before the deployment, it was cancelled for another mission which would later turn into OIF. Currently the whole battalion minus C/51st are deployed in Iraq. Because they did not bring the CCP platoon, Charlie Company 50th Signal Battalion deployed with us to Iraq. Currently all battalion assets are located in Iraq. The present commanding officer of the 51st Signal Battalion is: LTC Jochen (Yogi) Thomas. LTC Jochen was the "Keynote Speaker" at the 51st Signal Reunion Asso's Sept., 2004 meeting in Nashville (Sept.). I n early 2005 the Battalion was redeployed back to Iraq and they are not expected back till April or May of 2006. The unit's distinctive insignia depicts a band of telegraph poles alluding to the unit's original function as the 55th Telegraph Battalion during World War I. The unit's motto: "Semper Constans" meaning "Always Constant" is also depicted at the bottom of the insignia During the Korean War the battalion supported I Corps in ten campaigns and would receive two Meritorious Unit Commendations and the Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation. the battalion would remain in Korea after the hostilities as part of the Eighth Army.It was reorganized on 13 February 1955 as the 51st Signal Battalion. In 1974, the first women soldiers arrived. Within two years there were 56 female enlisted and 2 female officers. The battalion remained in Korea until16 March 1981. Then it moved to Ludwigsburg, Germany where it supported VII Corps. "Operation Desert Shield" On November 8,1990 the battalion was altered for immediate deployment to Saudi Arabia. Within 3 weeks it had personnel on the ground in Saudi Arabia. While the war only lasted 100 hours, it was the 15 of April, 1991, before they returned to Germany. At noon April 15, 1993. the 51st lowered the American flag for the last time in Germany On April 16, 1993,the 51st's Colors were duly unfurled at Fort Bragg, North Carolina and for the first time it was commanded by a female, LTC Velma L. Richardson. On 1 October 1993 the unit was redesignated the 51st Signal Battalion (Airborne).For the last 5 years, the 51st focused on training, maintenance and standard force readiness for overseas deployments from Fort Bragg. The 51st is a proud unit filled with a great history and traditions. They will continue to strive for excellence. To add onto the history. Since the Global War on Terrorism has started, 51st Signal Battalion (Airborne) has played an active part. C/51st sent the CCP (Corps Contingency Package) Platoon along with 327th Signal Bn to Afghanistan. They did a 6 month rotation from May until Oct 2002 there. We also have had a Platoon from B/51st attached to 123rd Signal (3ID). They were in Kuwait from September 2002 until August 2003. Once Operation IRAQI FREEDOM started they moved into Iraq. They are still over there in support of the war. Last October, the Battalion was prepared to deploy to Afghanistan for OEF, a week before the deployment, it was cancelled for another mission which would later turn into OIF. Currently the whole battalion minus C/51st are deployed in Iraq. Because they did not bring the CCP platoon, Charlie Company 50th Signal Battalion deployed with us to Iraq. Currently all battalion assets are located in Iraq. The commanding officer( 2004-05 ) of the 51st Signal Battalion was : LTC Jochen (Yogi) Thomas. LTC Jochen was the "Keynote Speaker" at the 51st Signal Reunion Asso's Sept., 2004 meeting in Nashville (Sept.). I n early 2005 the Battalion was redeployed back to Iraq and they are not expected back till April or May of 2006. The unit's distinctive insignia depicts a band of telegraph poles alluding to the unit's original function as the 55th Telegraph Battalion during World War I. The unit's motto: "Semper Constans" meaning "Always Constant" is also depicted at the bottom of the insignia Ltc Jochen Thomas has been replaced by Ltc Mark A Elliot.
In Dec. 2005, the Bn returned to Ft. Bragg. from their second tour in Iraq.
At this time ( Mar., 2006 ) the Bn is scheduled to be deactivated in Sept., 2006.

Posted by Tommy Thompson
Mar 06 2006 04:58:33:000PM




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