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Histories for 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery (1960s to Present)




2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery
2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment "Gunners" In 2008, the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment was reorganized as part of the transformation of the 1st Armored Division to the US Army's new modular force structure. As part of this transformation, support elements previously held at division level, but habitually attached to its brigades during operations were made organic to those brigades. 2-3rd Field Artillery was inactivated and reassigned from the Division Artillery (DIVARTY), itself inactivated, to the 1st Brigade Combat Team, which was subsequently reactivated in October 2008. The 1st Brigade Combat Team also conducted a permenant change of station from bases in Germany to Fort Bliss, Texas, which became the new home of the 2-3rd Field Artillery. Prior to the transformation, the "Gunner" Battalion had been based in Giessen, Germany. It was designated as part of the Division Artillery (DIVARTY) to provide lethal and non-lethal direct support artillery fires for 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division, then located in Friedberg, Germany. The 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment at the time consisted of 18 155mm M109A6 Howitzers, 15 M981 Fire Support Team Vehicles (FIST-V), and more than 600 personnel. The history of the 2d Battalion, 3d Field Artillery Regiment began on 11 January 1812 when the first Gunner's were mustered as a company of the 2nd Regiment of Artillery. The company was formally organized in July 1812 near Salisbury, North Carolina as Captain Sanders Donoho's Company, the 2nd Regiment of Artillery. The Gunners were immediately involved in their first combat in the Canadian Campaign during the War of 1812. The Company was consolidated in December 1812 with Captain William A. Whitted's Company, 2nd Regiment of Artillery (first constituted on 11 January 1812 and organized in the Regular Army), and the consolidated unit was designated as Captain Sanders Donoho's Company, 2nd Regiment of Artillery. This company was redesignated on 12 May 1814 as Captain Sanders Donoho's Company, Corps of Artillery. It was further consolidated in the summer of 1814 with Captain Jesse Robinson's Company of Artillery (first constituted on 11 January 1812 in the Regular Army as Captain Jesse Robinson's Company, 2nd Regiment of Artillery, and organized at Camp Pinckney, Georgia) and consolidated unit designated as Captain Sanders Donoho's Company, Corps of Artillery. The unit was redesignated on 17 May 1815 as Captain Sanders Donoho's Company, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division and again on 21 August 1816 as Company E, 1st Battalion, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division. This company was consolidated on 17 June 1819 with Company Q, 1st Battalion, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division. Company Q, 1st Battalion, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division was first constituted on 11 January 1812 in the Regular Army as a company in the 2nd Regiment of Artillery. It was organized in August 1812 at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina, as Captain Jacob Bond I'on's Company, 2nd Regiment of Artillery. It was redesignated on 12 May 1814 as Captain Jacob Bond I'on's Company, Corps of Artillery, on 17 May 1815 as Captain Jacob Bond I'on's Company, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division, and finally on 21 August 1816 as Company Q, 1st Battalion, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division. The consolidated unit was designated as Company E, 1st Battalion, Corps of Artillery, Southern Division. It was redesignated on 1 June 1821 as Company F, 3rd Regiment of Artillery. Between 1831 and 1838, the unit earned 2 battle streamers in the Indian Wars, fighting in campaigns against the Seminoles in Florida. For its service during the Mexican War, the unit earned 13 battle streamers, participating in battles at Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo. Less than 15 years later, the American Civil War would see the unit add a further 14 battle streamers to its color. The Company fought in campaigns at Antietam, Fredricksberg, the Wilderness, Gettysburg, Chancelorsville, and Petersburg. In 1898, the Company participated in the Santiago Campaign of the Spanish-American War. On 13 February 1901, the unit was reorganized and redesignated as the 6th Battery, Field Artillery, Artillery Corps. It was reorganized and redesignated again on 31 May 1907 as Battery A, 3rd Field Artillery. The 3rd Field Artillery was assigned on 17 November 1917 to the 6th Division. In July 1918, the unit deployed to Europe with the 6th Division. The unit arrived short of equipment and transportation assets, and by the time it was reconstituted, World War I had ended and the Battery redeployed without firing a shot in anger. It was relieved on 24 March 1923 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 5th Division. It was relieved on 1 January 1930 from assignment to the 5th Division and assigned to the 6th Division. The Battery was inactivated on 3 December 1934 at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. The 3rd Field Artillery was relieved on 25 September 1939 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 2nd Cavalry Division. The Battery was reactivated on 1 October 1939 at Fort Riley, Kansas. It was reorganized and redesignated on 1 January 1941 as Battery A, 3rd Field Artillery Battalion. It was again reorganized and redesignated on 15 July 1942 as Battery A, 3rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion. The 3rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion was concurrently relieved from assignment to the 2nd Cavalry Division and assigned to the 9th Armored Division. In August 1944, the Battery returned to action in Europe, this time as part of the 9th Armored Division. Landing in France in late September 1944, the Battery, along with the rest of the 3rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion drove across the recently liberated country. The Battalion soon became engaged with the Germans along the Siegfried Line on Germany's western border. During the "Battle of the Bulge" in December 1944 and January 1945, the Battalion helped to relieve the garrison at Bastogne, and later supported the drive into Germany across the Rhine River at Remagen. It smashed its way through central Germany near Wetzlar, driving northward toward Berlin and then south into Czechoslovakia before taking up occupation duty near N?rnberg. For its actions during the war the Battalion earned the most decorations of any unit in the Division Artillery. Following the end of World War II, the 3rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion was relieved 6 July 1945 from assignment to the 9th Armored Division, and Battery A, along with the rest of the Battalion was inactivated on 20 October 1946 in Germany. The 3rd Armored Field Artillery Battalion was assigned on 20 October 1950 to the 2nd Armored Division and Battery A was reactivated with the rest of the Battalion on 10 November 1950 at Fort Hood, Texas. It was inactivated on 1 July 1957 in Germany and relieved from assignment to the 2nd Armored Division. Battery A was redesignated on 30 August 1957 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 3rd Artillery with its organic elements concurrently constituted. On 1 October 1957, the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery began a long-standing relationship with the 3rd Armored Division in the Federal Republic of Germany, providing direct support artillery fires for the 1st Brigade "Ready First" Combat Team, in Kirchg?ns. The Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 3rd Artillery, was consolidated on 1 January 1960 with Battery C, 3rd Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion (which had been first organized in 1812), and the consolidated unit was designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, 3rd Artillery. The unit was redesignated on 1 September 1963 as the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Artillery. It was reorganized and redesignated (less former Battery C, 3rd Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion) on 1 September 1971 as the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery. The former Battery C, 3rd Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion was concurrently redesignated as the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Air Defense Artillery, and thereafter had a separate lineage. In November 1989, when the fall of the Berlin Wall heralded the end of the Cold War between NATO and Warsaw Pact countries, the Gunners experienced a short-lived peace. In January 1991, the Battalion deployed to Saudi Arabia as the direct support battalion for the 1st Brigade "Ready First" Combat Team, 3rd Armored Division in first Operation Desert Shield and then Operation Desert Storm. The Battalion was located in Tactical Assembly Area Henry until 19 February 1991, when the battalion moved to Forward Assembly Area Butts with the 3rd Armored Division. On 24 February 1991, the Battalion moved across the Iraqi border in support of Operation Desert Storm. During the first 2 days, the Battalion moved into enemy territory, picking up a reinforcing battalion, the 2nd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery en route. On 26 February 1991, the "Ready First" Combat Team encountered the enemy for the first time and the Gunners fired their first round at the enemy since 1945. During the war, the Battalion fired 1467 rounds in operations against the Republican Guard, including the Battle of 73 Easting. In mid-June 1991, the Battalion returned to Kirchg?ns, Germany. With units reorganizing in the draw-down of forces in Europe, the Battalion became part of the 8th Infantry Division Artillery on 16 August 1991. The Battalion was further redesignated in 16 January 1992 when it became part of the 1st Armored Division Artillery. In November 1995, representatives of the 3 warring factions from Bosnia met in Dayton, Ohio and set up the Dayton Peace Accord. The Gunners deployed to Bosnia to assist in implementing the Accord. The Battalion became responsible for providing fire support to the 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division, and to the Nordic-Polish Brigade. In late October 1996 the Battalion assisted the 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery in their transition into Bosnia. By the end of November 1996 the Gunners had returned to the Kirchg?ns area. In May 1997, the Battalion moved from Ayers Kaserne to Gie?en Depot. In October 1997, A Battery and Task Force 1-36th FSE once again deployed to Bosnia to assist in the continuing efforts of the NATO peace mission. In late February 1998, B Battery deployed to Bosnia to conduct a relief-in-place with A Battery. In mid-2000, the 4th Brigade (Aviation) and 2-3rd Field Artillery combined the bone-jarring shock of the M109A6 Paladin with the lethality and pin-point-precision of Apache and Kiowa Warrior helicopters in a Fire Control Exercise. In 2008, the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment was reorganized as part of the transformation of the 1st Armored Division to the US Army's new modular force structure. As part of this transformation, support elements previously held at division level, but habitually attached to its brigades during operations were made organic to those brigades. 2-3rd Field Artillery was inactivated and reassigned from the Division Artillery (DIVARTY), itself inactivated, to the 1st Brigade Combat Team, which was subsequently reactivated in October 2008. The 1st Brigade Combat Team also conducted a permenant change of station from bases in Germany to Fort Bliss, Texas, which became the new home of the 2-3rd Field Artillery. Units ■HHB ■A Battery ■B Battery ■C Battery ■Service Battery Facilities ■Fort Bliss, TX ■Giessen, Germany (Past)

Posted by Rodney Brewer
Nov 18 2010 02:37:55:000PM




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