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Satellite photo of Lingshui Airfield taken 10 April (SpaceImaging.com)

U.S. Hoping For Quick Return Of Aircrew Held By China
Crew Blames Crash on Jet
China: US Statements 'Unacceptable'
Families of the Crew Begin to Feel the Strain
China's Military Demands Hard Line
Timeline
Talks Under Way to Release Crew
CNN: Powell: Detainees In China 'Looked Good'
DoD News Briefing, April 3
Crew Member Names
 Transcript of U.S. Pacific Command Press Conference
Official Chinese Press Release (English Version)
 EP-3 Aries II
 Shenyang J-8 (F-8 Finback)
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Chronology of the China-U.S. spy plane standoff

A chronology of the spy plane crash and diplomatic maneuvering between the United States and China.

DAY 1 - Sunday, April 1:

- A U.S. Navy EP-3E surveillance plane with a 21-man, 3-woman crew collides with a Chinese fighter jet sent to intercept it over the South China Sea, well outside China's 19-kilometer (12-mile ) territorial sea and airspace. It makes an emergency landing at a military airfield on China's Hainan island.

- China says the plane's crew members are safe but reports the Chinese fighter crashed and its pilot is missing. Beijing blames the U.S. aircraft for the collision.

- Adm. Dennis Blair, commander in chief of the U.S. Pacific Command, says the collision was caused by a ``pattern of increasingly unsafe behavior'' by China's military.

DAY 2 - Monday, April 2:

- U.S. diplomats leave for Hainan hoping to meet with American crew members.

- President George W. Bush urges China to release the aircraft and let U.S. diplomats meet crew members. Says failure to do so would violate ``standard diplomatic practice.''

DAY 3 - Tuesday, April 3:

- President Bush says China must release crew and plane. Secretary of State Colin Powell says crew is detained by China and that the United States has nothing to apologize for.

- U.S. diplomats meet with crew members and report they are fine.

DAY 4 - Wednesday, April 4:

- Chinese President Jiang Zemin demands a U.S. apology.

- The Bush administration offers regrets but no apology.

DAY 5 - Thursday, April 5:

- In Beijing, police detain several Chinese protesters outside U.S. Embassy.

- China says the American crew members broke international law and will be kept for questioning, repeats demand for formal U.S. apology.

- U.S. diplomats give Chinese officials books, magazines and snacks for the crew members.

DAY 6 - Friday, April 6:

- U.S. diplomats see crew members. Powell says they are in ``good health'' and ``high spirits'' and that diplomats may get to meet with them regularly.

- Both sides begin reviewing a draft letter intended to end the stalemate that would express regrets for the loss of life and entail an exchange of views on the collision.

DAY 7 - Saturday, April 7

- China's top foreign affairs official writes Powell to say statements of regret are inadequate and demand an apology.

- U.S. side says its position is unchanged.

DAY 8 - Sunday, April 8

- Talks continue on freeing crew. Bush sends letter expressing condolences to wife of missing Chinese fighter pilot.

DAY 9 - Monday, April 9

- President Bush cautions that ``diplomacy takes time'' but warns China that relations could suffer if it doesn't release the crew.

DAY 10 - Tuesday, April 10

- China says Powell's expression of regret is a step in the right direction, repeats demand for apology.

- President Bush describes situation as a ``stalemate.''

DAY 11 - Wednesday, April 11

- United States and China reach agreement for crew's release.

Copyright 2001 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


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